Creativity and Methodology

  • Alan Maley
  • Tamas Kiss
Chapter

Abstract

The chapter first reviews major shifts in thinking about methodology—from the Communicative Approach, through corpus influences, the impact of discourse analysis and lexicology, extensive reading, humanistic currents, Prabhu’s procedural syllabus and task-based learning—and to more recent developments in Dogme and CLIL. We consider the questionable creative contributions of testing, technology and materials on the domain of methodology. The designer methods of the 1970s are also discussed. We consider why such highly creative methods have so little impact. We then present some more personal contributions, including Graham’s jazz chants, drama, positive psychology and so on. Finally we relate the factors of person, process, product and press to creative methodology.

Keywords

Communicative Testing Technology Material Affect Task-based learning Designer methods Creative processes 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan Maley
    • 1
  • Tamas Kiss
    • 2
  1. 1.The C GroupFordwichUK
  2. 2.Xi’an Jiaotong – Liverpool UniversitySuzhouChina

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