Skip to main content

Surfing Together: Exploring the Potential of a Collaborative Ethnographic Moment

Part of the Global Culture and Sport Series book series (GCS)

Abstract

With ethnographic methods key for action sport researchers, many are approaching the field with pre-existing cultural participation, knowledge and relationships. The complexities of researching from an “insider” perspective have inspired debates amongst scholars about validity, reflexivity and power in action sports cultures, as well as in research methods. Addressing issues of reflexivity in subjective and analytical isolation is difficult. This chapter discusses a collaborative research ‘moment’ in which seven researchers took part in the same ethnographic field visit to a surfbreak. In an exploratory way, the project sought to explore the potential of collaborative approaches to fieldwork for accessing multiple geographical and subjective perspectives in the field. This chapter focuses on the ‘dynamic tensions’ that emerged through the research process, and how these were productive in revealing difficult to locate and invisible positionalities that may impact our capacity to make sense and meaning of our observations and experiences as participants, observers and researcher’s.

Keywords

  • Power Relation
  • Action Sport
  • Field Note
  • Blind Spot
  • Multiple Position

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1057/978-1-137-45797-4_3
  • Chapter length: 24 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   64.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-1-137-45797-4
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   84.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book
USD   119.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Fig. 3.1
Fig. 3.2
Fig. 3.3
Fig. 3.4

References

  • Beal, B. (1995). Disqualifying the official: An exploration of social resistance through the subculture of skateboarding. Sociology of Sport Journal, 12, 252–267.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Beal, B. (1996). Alternative masculinity and its effect on gender relations in the subculture of skateboarding. Journal of Sports Behaviour, 19, 204–220.

    Google Scholar 

  • Blumer, M. L. C., Green, M. S., Murphy, M. J., & Palmanteer, D. (2007). Creating a collaborative research team. Journal of Feminist Family Therapy, 19(1), 41–54.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Carrington, B. (2008). “What’s the footballer doing here?”: Racialized performativity, reflexivity, and identity. Cultural Studies: Critical Methodologies, 8(4), 423–452.

    Google Scholar 

  • Davies, C. A. (2007). Reflexive ethnography: A guide to researching selves and others (2nd ed.). Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Davis, K. (1997). Embody-ing theory: Beyond modernist and postmodernist readings of the body. In K. Davis (Ed.), Embodied practices: Feminist perspectives on the body (pp. 1–23). London: Sage.

    Google Scholar 

  • Donnelly, M. K. (2006). Studying extreme sports: Beyond the core participants. Journal of Sport and Social Issues, 20, 219–224.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Diversi, M., & Moreira, C. (2009). Betweener talk: Decolonizing knowledge production, pedagogy and praxis. Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Evers, C. (2006). How to surf. Journal of Sport and Social Issues, 30(3), 229–243.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Flemons, D., & Green, S. (2002). Stories that conform/stories that transform: A conversation in four parts. In A. P. Bochner & C. Ellis (Eds.), Ethnographically speaking: Autoethnography, literature, and aesthetics (pp. 87–94, 115–121, 165–169, 187–190). Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Francombe, J., Rich, E., & De Pian, L. (2014). I move like you…but different: Biopolitics and embodied methodologies. Cultural Studies: Critical Methodologies, 14(5), 471–482.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gale, K., & Wyatt, J. (2009). Between the two: A nomadic inquiry into collaborative writing and subjectivity. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gerstl-Pepin, C. I., & Gunzenhauser, M. G. (2002). Collaborative team ethnography and the paradoxes of interpretation. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 15(2), 137–154.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Humberstone, B. (1986). Outdoor education—The quality of the learning experience. An application of ethnographic research method trends and developments in PE. In Proceedings of the V111 Commonwealth and International Conference on PE, Dance, Recreation and Health (pp. 438–445). London: E & FN Spon.

    Google Scholar 

  • Humberstone, B. (2004). Standpoint research: Multiple versions of reality in tourism theorising and research. In J. Phillimore & L. Goodson (Eds.), Qualitative research in tourism. Ontologies, epistemologies, methodologies and method (pp. 119–136). London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Humberstone, B. (2009). Inside/outside the Western ‘Bubble’: The nexus of adventure, adventure sports and perceptions of risk in UK and Mauritius. In J. Ormrod & B. Wheaton (Eds.), On the edge: Leisure, consumption and the representation of adventure sports (pp. 97–112). Eastbourne: Leisure Studies Association. Publication No. 104.

    Google Scholar 

  • Humberstone, B. (2015). Embodied narratives: Being with the sea. In M. Brown & B. Humberstone (Eds.), Seascapes: Shaped by the se, embodied narratives and fluid geographies (pp. 27–40). Surrey: Ashgate Publications.

    Google Scholar 

  • lisahunter (2013). What did I do-see-learn at the beach? Surfing festival as a cultural pedagogical sight/site. In L. Azzarito & D. Kirk (Eds.), Physical culture, pedagogies and visual methods (pp. 144–161). New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • lisahunter (2015). Seaspaces: Surfing the sea as pedagogy of self. In M. Brown & B. Humberstone (Eds.), Seascapes: Shaped by the sea (pp. 41–54). Surrey, England: Ashgate.

    Google Scholar 

  • May, R., & Pattillo-McCoy, M. (2000). Patillo-McCoy 00 Do you see what i see? examining a collaborative ethnography. Qualitative Inquiry, 6(1), 65–87.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Nemani, M. (2014). Getting deep: Experiences of New Zealand bodyboarders. Unpublished Masters, University of Waikato.

    Google Scholar 

  • Olive, R. (2015). Surfing, localism, place-based pedagogies, and ecological sensibilities in Australia. In B. Humberstone, H. Prince & K. Henderson (Eds.), Routledge International Handbook of Outdoor Studies (pp. 501–510). Oxon, UK: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Olive, R. (2016). Women who surf: Female difference, intersecting subjectivities and cultural pedagogies. In A. Hickey (Ed.) The Pedagogies of Cultural Studies (pp.179–197) Oxon, UK: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Olive, R., McCuaig, L., & Phillips, M. G. (2015). Women’s recreational surfing: A patronizing experience, Sport. Education and Society, 20(2), 258–276.

    Google Scholar 

  • Olive, R., & Thorpe, H. (2011). Negotiating the “F-Word” in the field: Doing feminist ethnography in action sport cultures. Sociology of Sport Journal, 28(4), 421–440.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Pavlidis, A., & Olive, R. (2014). On the track/in the bleachers: Authenticity and feminist ethnographic research in sport and physical cultures. Sport in Society: Cultures, Commerce, Media, Politics, 17(2), 218–232.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Rinehart, R. E., & Sydnor, S. (Eds.) (2003). To the extreme. Alternative sports: Inside and out. Albany: University of New York Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Roy, G. (2011). Exploring the feminist potential of the female surfer: Surfing, spaces and subjectivities. In B. Watson & J. Harpin (Eds.), Diversity and equality in leisure, sport and tourism: Identities, cultures and voices. Eastbourne: LSA Publication.

    Google Scholar 

  • Roy, G. (2013). Women in wetsuits: Revolting bodies in lesbian surf culture. Journal of Lesbian Studies, 17(3–4), 329–343.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Thorpe, H. (2012). The ethnographic (i)nterview in the sports field: Toward a postmodern sensibility. In K. Young & M. Atkinson (Eds.), Qualitative research on sport and physical culture (pp. 51–78). Bradford: Emerald Group Publishing.

    Google Scholar 

  • Thorpe, H. (2014). Transnational mobilities in action sport cultures. Houndsmills: Palgrave Macmillan.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Thorpe, H., Barbour, K., & Bruce, T. (2011). ‘Wandering and wondering’: Theory and representation in feminist physical cultural studies. Sociology of Sport Journal, 28(1), 106–134.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Thorpe, H., & Olive, R. (2016). Observations in sport and physical cultural studies. In B. Smith & A. Sparkes (Eds.), International handbook of qualitative research in sport and exercise (pp. 124–138). London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Thorpe, H., & Wheaton, B. (2013). Dissecting action sports studies: Past, present and beyond. In D. Andrews & B. Carrington (Eds.), A companion to sport (pp. 341–358). Oxford: Blackwell.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Saukko, P. (2003). Doing research in cultural studies: An introduction to classical and new methodological approaches. London: Sage.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Sparkes, A. C. (2002). Telling tales in sport and physical activity: A qualitative journey. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wasser, J., & Bressler, L. (1996). Working the interpretative zone: Conceptualizing collaboration in qualitative research teams. Educational Researcher, 25(5), 5–15.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Wheaton, B. (2000). “New lads”?: Masculinities and the “new sport” participant. Men and Masculinities, 2(4), 434–456.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Wheaton, B. (2002). Babes on the beach, women in the surf: Researching gender, power and difference in the windsurfing culture. In J. Sugden & A. Tomlinson (Eds.), Power games: A critical sociology of sport (pp. 240–266). London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wheaton, B. (2004). Mapping the lifestyle sport-scape. In B. Wheaton (Ed.), Understanding lifestyle sports: Consumption, identity and difference (pp. 1–28). London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wheaton, B. (2007). After sport culture: Rethinking sport and post-structural theory. Journal of Sport and Social Issues, 31(3), 283–307.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Wheaton, B., & Tomlinson, A. (1998). The changing gender order in sport?: The case of windsurfing subcultures. Journal of Sport and Social Issues, 22(3), 252–274.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Copyright information

© 2016 The Author(s)

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Olive, R. et al. (2016). Surfing Together: Exploring the Potential of a Collaborative Ethnographic Moment. In: Thorpe, H., Olive, R. (eds) Women in Action Sport Cultures. Global Culture and Sport Series. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-45797-4_3

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-45797-4_3

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, London

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-137-45796-7

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-137-45797-4

  • eBook Packages: Social SciencesSocial Sciences (R0)