Skip to main content

Historical Political Economy

  • Chapter
  • First Online:
The Palgrave Handbook of Political Economy

Abstract

This chapter explores the cyclicality of historical awareness in economics. It shows how, over the centuries, there have been numerous moments when a tendency toward theoretical abstraction has resulted in real-world catastrophes which, in turn, have inspired a return to more historically-grounded approaches to economic inquiry and policy.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this chapter

Subscribe and save

Springer+ Basic
EUR 32.99 /Month
  • Get 10 units per month
  • Download Article/Chapter or eBook
  • 1 Unit = 1 Article or 1 Chapter
  • Cancel anytime
Subscribe now

Buy Now

Chapter
USD 29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
eBook
USD 349.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as EPUB and PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
Hardcover Book
USD 449.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Durable hardcover edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Institutional subscriptions

Similar content being viewed by others

Notes

  1. 1.

    These categories remain trenchant in the historiography of economics, see, for example, Eklund and Hebert (1997, p. 61). On Gay, see still Heaton (1952). The literature on Gustav von Schmoller is growing, for which see still Peukert (2001, pp. 71–116). On the historical school in Germany, see Grimmer-Solem (2003). On Schmoller and his method, see furthermore Gioja (1990) and Priddat (1995). On Roscher, see Backhaus (1995).

  2. 2.

    The literature on Physiocracy is extensive, but see Kaplan (2015a, b).

  3. 3.

    See for similar arguments also Hodgson (2001) and Milonakis and Fine (2009, p. 111). On the similar fate of institutional economics, see Hodgson (2004, p. 391 and passim) and Rutherford (2011, p. 311 and passim).

  4. 4.

    It is important to note, however, that such a “concern with complexity did not entail a blind attempt to reproduce reality on a one to one scale,” see Grimmer-Solem and Romani (1999, p. 342).

  5. 5.

    I agree with Keith Tribe that “the study of history and economics” should be considered “part of the wider history of the social sciences, rather than a clash between inductive and deductive methods, or of historicism and rationalism,” but, given the arguments made by the historical actors in question themselves, it seems excessive to argue that the idea of a “historicist critique of economics” is “based largely on bad history.” See Tribe (2002, p. 20). Though far from the black-and-white situation suggested by much of historiography, historicist critiques of economics have been going on for centuries.

  6. 6.

    For a relevant compass for this tumultuous period in the history of economics, particularly given Gay’s background, see Schefold (1999, pp. 378–391).

  7. 7.

    There are many histories of this moment, but see among others Hodgson (2009) and Weintraub (2002).

  8. 8.

    For a post-Hawkingian meditation on time and eternity, see Carroll (2010). On Lovecraft’s political economy, see S.A. Reinert (2015).

  9. 9.

    For an intriguing take on the undead nature of economics, see also Quiggin (2012).

  10. 10.

    Discussed also in E.S. Reinert (2016, p. 337 and passim). For a now striking meditation on how increasing returns for a long time was sacrificed on the altar of mathematical simplicity, see Krugman (1994, pp. 39–58).

  11. 11.

    See, from different perspectives, Perez (2003) and James (2009).

  12. 12.

    For a remarkable recent selection of essays including a variety of historical approaches, see, however, Reinert et al. (2016).

  13. 13.

    On common sense in intellectual history, see Rosenfeld (2011). The literature on paradigm shifts has of course exploded in the wake of Kuhn (1962) on which see Isaac (2012).

  14. 14.

    On black swans, see of course Taleb (2007).

  15. 15.

    Most of these phrases are ubiquitous, but for “the economic hand of God,” in particular, see Facchinei (1763). For different perspectives on invisible hands, see among others Harrison (2011, pp. 29–49), Samuels et al. (2011), and Sheehan and Wahrman (2015).

  16. 16.

    The literature on this topic is as vast as the subject matter, but see also the classic Viner (1977). On the theme of religion and economics, see furthermore Nelson (2014, p. 346) and Agamben (2009). For concrete arguments that a divinity literally made the world so that markets should be free, see the long arc from Bencivenni (1774, pp. 292–294, 329–330, 342–345, 387–390) on the authorship of which see Pozzetti (1810, pp. 100–101), to McCloskey (2006, pp. 38, 438, 462). For providence-skeptical historical economists, see, for example, Balabkins (1988, p. 75).

  17. 17.

    On which see Romani (2004, pp. 37–65). That “economics” depended on the interplay of history on the one hand and theoretical abstraction on the other was mainstream at the time, see, for yet another example, Einaudi (2017, p. 1). For a timeless warning of ultimately believing the “fictive” nature of theoretical assumptions, see also Einaudi (194243, pp. 51–52) and Röpke (1942).

  18. 18.

    On which see S.A. Reinert (2016, pp. 112–142). On Serra as the first economist, see among others Schumpeter (1996, p. 195).

  19. 19.

    On which see among others Groenewegen (2001, pp. 93–115). On the phlogiston theory, once at the apex of scientific certainty, see among others the essays in Conant (1950).

  20. 20.

    The literature on Physiocracy is vast, but see, for a classic work on the subject Kaplan (2015a, b). More recently, see Shovlin (2007) and Sonenscher (2009).

  21. 21.

    On Physiocracy and history, see S.A. Reinert (2011, p. 284).

  22. 22.

    On Smith’s decidedly critical stance on Physiocratic reforms, see Hont (2005, p. 100).

  23. 23.

    See for a discussion also Kaplan (2015a, p. 683) and S.A. Reinert (2011, p. 283).

  24. 24.

    On European Antiphysiocracy, see now the essays in Kaplan and S.A. Reinert (2018‚ forthcoming).

  25. 25.

    See the frequently translated and republished List (1841). The literature on List is massive and growing in light of the recent crisis, but see still Tribe (1995, pp. 32–65) and Hont (2005, pp. 148–155). For an example of the recent flurry of publications, see Wendler (2015). On British free-trade imperialism, see still Semmel (1970). For the geographical limits to List’s argument, see Boianovsky (2013, pp. 647–691).

  26. 26.

    For an extended meditation on this tension, see S.A. Reinert (2011), but this is by now a mainstream argument. See, from very different perspectives, Brewer (1990), E.S. Reinert (1999, pp. 268–326), developed in E.S. Reinert (2007), Chang (2002), Nye (2007), and Pincus (2009).

  27. 27.

    Cardoso and Psalidopoulos (2016, p. xxvii). See also Johnson (1982), Wade (2003), Austin (2009), and Woo-Cumings (1999).

  28. 28.

    The literature on the German Historical School is vast, but see, in addition to the previously mentioned Grimmer-Solem (2003), Tribe (2002) as well as the essays in Shionoya (2005). On its wider influence see the essays in Cardoso and Psalidopoulos (2016), and for the American case the classic Balabkins (1988) as well as Herbst (1965) and Bateman (2011, pp. 108–124). For the Norwegian case, see Fasting (2014). For the case of Japan, see Nishizawa (2003, pp. 155–172)‚ Yanagisawa (2003)‚ as well as the essays in the classic Sugiyama and Mizuta (1988). On the larger transformation of economics in academic life in the period, see the project described in Claeys et al. (1993, pp. viii–x), and the literature there addressed. From the perspective of the history of political thought, see now McDaniel (2018).

  29. 29.

    For a brief overview, see Hagemann (2016, pp. 223–235). For caveats regarding the chronology of the German Historical School, see Lindenfeld (1993, pp. 405–416). The literature on German Cameralism is also flourishing, but see particularly Tribe (1988), Wakefield (2009), and S.A. Reinert (2011), pp. 233–245).

  30. 30.

    Grimmer-Solem and Romani (1999, p. 353). The question of whether or not the German Historical School was ever a “school” even was recently raised. See Pearson (1999, pp. 547–562), for rebuttals against which see Caldwell (2001, pp. 649–654) and Tribe (2002, p. 2n3). On objectivity and history more generally, see still Novick (1989).

  31. 31.

    The literature on this is, again, vast, but see Schumpeter (1996, pp. 814–815).

  32. 32.

    On John Neville Keynes, see Deane (2001).

  33. 33.

    On the explicit use of historicism to criticize more theoretical economics in the USA, for example, see Barber (2003, pp. 231–245, particularly pp. 240–241).

  34. 34.

    Though Cunningham himself felt he was changing his mind in light of recent events, p. [vii], he had always been oriented toward a historical political economy generally speaking, see, for example, Kadish (1993, p. 81 and passim).

  35. 35.

    See from different perspectives on this moment O’Rourke and Williamson (1999), Harper (2002, pp. 141–166), Mattelart (2000), Wenzlhuemer (2013), Osterhammel (2014), and Rosenberg (2012). For a popular account, see Wilson (2016). For an insightful theoretical take on the mechanisms of this, see again Perez (2003).

  36. 36.

    See among others the classic Bairoch and Kozul-Wright (1996). On this first grand moment of globalization, see among others O’Rourke and Willamson (1999).

  37. 37.

    The relocation of laissez-faire to distant planets is old news, see, for example, Genovesi (1764, vol. I, pp. 292–93n).

  38. 38.

    On the history of Darwinian influences on economics, see among others Hodgson (2004).

  39. 39.

    The construction of a worldwide dataset of such estimated GDP values had been the brainchild of the late Angus Maddison, now continued by an international team of scholars. See The Maddison Project, http://www.ggdc.net/maddison/maddison-project/home.htm. On recent updates to the dataset, see Bolt and Van Zanden (2014, pp. 627–651). For a rather different argument, see a literature best represented by Pomeranz (2000, pp. 165, 276 and passim).

  40. 40.

    On the vast difference between Gross Domestic Product per capita in the UK and the rest of Europe, let alone the world, in the late nineteenth century, see Maddison (2007, p. 382).

  41. 41.

    On the much longer history of theorizing about cost-competition, see Hont (2008, pp. 243–323).

  42. 42.

    On the truth of this analysis, in the complex history of labor conditions under globalization, see among others Bonanno (2013, pp. 21–41, particularly p. 37).

  43. 43.

    The phrase was used to compare Gunnar Myrdal and, by reflection, large parts of early development economics, to Johann Gottlieb Fichte by Heilperin (1960, p. 149). On Fichte’s actual political economy, see Nakhimovsky (2011). More recently, isolated states are seen as nothing less than cancers in the global body; as Harold James argues, if countries “cannot export goods and participate in international society, they will not remain simply self-contained in a ghetto of misery and inhumanity. They will export their problems: their terrorism, their violence, and even their diseases.” See James (2001, p. 217).

  44. 44.

    See, for example, Boldizzoni (2011, p. 3 and passim) and Kadish (1989, pp. 221–245). On popular turns to history in the face of crises, see also James (2001, p. 65).

  45. 45.

    On Jackman, see Innis (1952, pp. 201–204). On the no less relevant Innis, see Watson (2007).

  46. 46.

    See, for example, Keynes (1936, p. 381). The literature on Keynes also exploded with the financial crisis of 2008, but see Skidelsky (19832000) as well as the aptly titled Skidelsky (2009) and Backhouse and Bateman (2011).

  47. 47.

    On Robinson see Harcourt and Kerr (2009).

  48. 48.

    The first variation of the quote may have been in “Art. I. [Review of A. N. Mouravieff’s A History of the Church in Russia],” The Christian Remembrancer, October 1845 [vol. 10, London: Burns, 1845], pp. 245–331, p. 264: “history repeats her tale unconsciously, and goes off into a mystic rhyme; ages are prototypes of other ages, and the winding course of time brings us round to the same spot again.”

  49. 49.

    On which see among others Hudson and Tribe (2017).

  50. 50.

    Barnard (2013, p. 9) claiming someone ignorant of the history of economics risks being a “cittadino coglione,” a less vulgar but also less colorful rendition of which would be “stupid citizen.”

  51. 51.

    “The financial crisis of 2008,” Cardoso and Psalidopoulos (2016, p. xiv) have rightly observed, “has revived interest in economic scholarship from a historical perspective.” For an earlier, similar statement, see, for example, Peukert (2001, pp. 73–74), and even the memorable warning that “graduate programs may be turning out a generation with too many idiot savants skilled in technique but innocent of real economic issues” in Krueger et al. (1991, pp. 1044–1045).

  52. 52.

    Though they do not quote that particular passage by Hamilton, it deeply influences Cohen and DeLong (2016) and similarly Rodrik (2016).

  53. 53.

    On current trade flows, see Appelbaum (2016). For just two examples of what undoubtedly will become a cottage industry, see Judis (2016) and Mishra (2017).

  54. 54.

    “League of Nationalists” (2016) and Dalio (2016). On Dalio see still the portrait by Cassidy (2011) and, for a more academic use of comparisons with the 1930s, O’Rourke (2016, pp. 110–114) and Ferguson (2016).

  55. 55.

    See recently Fourcade et al. (2015, pp. 89–114).

  56. 56.

    On the continuing relevance of this moment though, see Meier and Stiglitz (2001) and Sunna and Gualerzi (2016).

  57. 57.

    For a rather less forgiving reading of the story, see Chitonge (2015, pp. 1–3 and passim).

  58. 58.

    For a transparent restatement of the argument, see Smith (2015, p. 279) and Evensky (2015, p. 118).

  59. 59.

    On these events, see now the essays in Aaslestad and Joor (2014).

  60. 60.

    See among other works on this tradition Meek (1976) and Palmieri (2016).

  61. 61.

    On Vico, see Robertson (2005). On Vico and economics, see still Tagliacozzo (1969, pp. 349–368).

  62. 62.

    Vico even applied these methods to himself in his Vico (1725–28/1944, pp. 113, 120 and passim). See also Vico (1708–9/1990).

  63. 63.

    For context, see also Appelqvist (2014, p. 72).

  64. 64.

    Friedman (1953, p. 4) drawing on Keynes (1891, plausibly pp. 4, 49, but also passim), recalling the famous distinction lionized by Hume (1739, p. 335). The acronym “WEIRD” was popularized by Diamond (2012, pp. 8–9 and passim).

  65. 65.

    See, on economic assumptions, among others Mankiw (2014, pp. 21–22) and Schlefer (2012).

  66. 66.

    See, for example, Baycroft and Hewitson (2006, p. 3 and passim) and Stepan et al. (2011).

  67. 67.

    The literature on this remarkable figure is ever-growing, but see the classic biography by Faucci (1986). On the importance of historical knowledge for Einaudi’s economics, see among others Schumpeter (1996, p. 855) and Forte and Marchionatti (2012, pp. 599–608).

  68. 68.

    For a discussion of which see Fredona and Reinert (2017). See, for a similar point, Peukert (2001, p. 97f61).

  69. 69.

    On Walras and his contribution, see now Tribe (2015, pp. 255–295).

  70. 70.

    Richard Whatmore recalls Istvan Hont proclaiming that “methodology is for stupid people,” in Whatmore (2015, p. 10); my recollection is of him arguing that “methodological work has never said anything interesting.” The point remains.

  71. 71.

    Lincoln (1932, p. 665) and Hont (2005, p. 155). See similarly S.A. Reinert (2011, p. 12) and Tribe (2015, pp. 311–312).

  72. 72.

    See the recollections of Schumpeter’s equation of the Great Depression with a “good cold douche” in Heilbronner (1999, p. 291) and Eichengreen (2014, pp. 385–386).

  73. 73.

    For a salutary reminder of the relationship between economics and the public sphere, see Maas (2014, p. 174).

  74. 74.

    See, among others, Rees (2003), Lynas (2008), and Kolbert (2014).

  75. 75.

    See on this theme S.A. Reinert (2010, pp. 1395–1425).

  76. 76.

    On the origins of the term “homo sapiens,” see among others Broberg (1975), and for its history Harari (2015). On the elusiveness of wisdom, see Hall (2010).

  77. 77.

    On the case method, emphasizing the virtues of wisdom and judgment, see still Gragg (1951), and the classic essays in Christensen et al. (1992). On political judgment, see recently the essays in Bourke and Geuss (2009). For Friedman’s point, see, for example, his argument that there “inevitably” would be a need for “judgment” in economics in Friedman (1953, p. 25).

  78. 78.

    On which see Silvestri (2017, pp. 23–24).

References

  • Aaslestad, K.B., and J. Joor (eds.). 2014. Revisiting Napoleon’s Continental System: Local, Regional, and European Experiences. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

    Google Scholar 

  • Agamben, G. 2009. Il regno e la Gloria: Per una genealogia teologica dell’economia e del governo. Milan: Bollati Boringhieri.

    Google Scholar 

  • Anonymous. 1851. The Republic of Colombia, and the External Policy of England. The American Whig Review (September): 258–267.

    Google Scholar 

  • Appelqvist, Ö. 2014. The Political Economy of Gunnar Myrdal: Transcending Dilemmas Post-2008. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Appelbaum, B. 2016. A Little-Noticed Fact About Trade: It’s No Longer Rising. New York Times, October 30.

    Google Scholar 

  • Arrow, K.J. 1994. “Foreword,” to W. Brian Arthur. In Increasing Returns and Path Dependence in the Economy. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Austin, I.P. 2009. Common Foundations of American and East Asian Modernisation: From Alexander Hamilton to Junichero Koizumi. Singapore: Select Publishing.

    Google Scholar 

  • Autor, D.H., D. Dorn, and G.H. Hanson. 2016. The China Shock: Learning from Labor-Market Adjustment to Large Changes in Trade. Annual Review of Economics 8: 205–240.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Backhaus, J.G. (ed.). 1995. Wilhelm Roscher and the ‘Historical Method’. Special issue, Journal of Economic Studies 22.

    Google Scholar 

  • Backhouse, R.E., and B.W. Bateman. 2011. Capitalist Revolutionary: John Maynard Keynes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Bairoch, P., and R. Kozul-Wright. 1996. Globalization Myths: Some Historical Reflections on Integration, Industrialization and Growth in the World Economy. Unctad Discussion Papers No. 113.

    Google Scholar 

  • Balabkins, N. 1988. Not by Theory Alone… The Economics of Gustav von Schmoller and Its Legacy to America. Berlin: Duncker & Humblot.

    Google Scholar 

  • Barber, W.J. 2003. American Economics to 1900. In A Companion to the History of Economic Thought, ed. W.J. Samuels, J.E. Biddle, and J. Davis, 215–230. Oxford: Blackwell.

    Google Scholar 

  • Barnard, P. 2013. La Storia dell’economia (che ti dà da mangiare) spiegata a Lollo del mio bar. Rome: Andromeda Edizioni.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bateman, B.W. 2011. German Influences in the Making of American Economics. In The Dissemination of Economic Ideas, ed. H.D. Kurz, T. Nishizawa, and K. Tribe, 108–124. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

    Google Scholar 

  • Baycroft, T., and M. Hewitson. 2006. “Introduction,” in id. (eds.), What is a Nation?: Europe 1789–1914. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bencivenni, G.P. 1774. Lettera… di un nostro amico scritta al sig. N.N. sopra le scienze economiche. Novelle letterarie [Florence], vol. V, Florence, Allegrini, 292–294, 329–330, 342–345, 387–390 (the review ran from num. 19, 13 May to num. 24, 17 June, and was signed 2 April 1774).

    Google Scholar 

  • Boianovsky, M. 2013. Friedrich List and the Economic Fate of Tropical Countries. History of Political Economy 45 (4): 647–691.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Boldizzoni, F. 2011. The Poverty of Clio: Resurrecting Economic History. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bolt, J., and J.L. Van Zanden. 2014. The Maddison Project: Collaborative Research on Historical National Accounts. Economic History Review 67 (3): 627–651.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bonanno, A. 2013. Globalisation. In Handbook of Rural Development, ed. G.P. Green, 21–41. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bourke, R., and R. Geuss (eds.). 2009. Political Judgment: Essays for John Dunn. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Brewer, J. 1990. The Sinews of Power: War, Money and the English State, 1688–1783. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Broberg, G. 1975. Homo sapiens L: Studier i Carl von Linnés naturuppfattning och människolära. Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell.

    Google Scholar 

  • Caldwell, B. 2001. There Really Was a German Historical School of Economics: A Comment on Heath Pearson. History of Political Economy 33 (3): 649–654.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Cardoso, J.L., and M. Psalidopoulos. 2016. “Introduction,” in id. (eds.), The German Historical School and European Economic Thought, xiv–xxx. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, S. 2010. From Eternity to Here: The Quest for the Ultimate Theory of Time. New York: Dutton.

    Google Scholar 

  • Cassidy, J. 2011. Mastering the Machine: How Ray Dalio Built the World’s Richest and Strangest Hedge Fund. The New Yorker, July 25.

    Google Scholar 

  • Chang, H.-J. 2002. Kicking Away the Ladder: Development Strategy in Historical Perspective. London: Anthem.

    Google Scholar 

  • Chitonge, H. 2015. Economic Growth and Development in Africa: Understanding Trends and Prospects. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Christensen, C.R., D.A. Garvin, and A. Sweet (eds.). 1992. Education for Judgment: The Artistry of Discussion Leadership. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Claeys, G., I. Hont, A. Kadish, and K. Tribe. 1993. Editorial Preface: The Institutionalization of Political Economy in Europe, the United States, and Japan. In The Market for Political Economy: The Advent of Economics in British University Culture, 1850–1905, ed. A. Kadish and K. Tribe, viii–x. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Cohen, R. 2016. The Rage of 2016. The New York Times, December 6.

    Google Scholar 

  • Cohen, S.S., and J.B. DeLong. 2016. Concrete Economics: The Hamilton Approach to Economic Growth and Policy. Boston: Harvard Business Review Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Conant, J.B. (ed.). 1950. The Overthrow of Phlogiston Theory: The Chemical Revolution of 1775–1789. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Crawley, J. 2016. A Guide and Advice for Economists on the U.S. Junior Academic Job Market, 2016–2017 Edition. Nashville: American Economic Association.

    Google Scholar 

  • Cunningham, W. 1904. The Rise and Decline of the Free Trade Movement. London: C.J. Clay & Sons.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dalio, R. 2016. “Back to the Future”. The World in 2017. London: The Economist.

    Google Scholar 

  • Deane, P. 2001. The Life and Times of J. Neville Keynes. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

    Google Scholar 

  • Diamond, J. 2012. The World Until Yesterday: What Can We Learn from Traditional Societies? New York: Viking.

    Google Scholar 

  • Eichengreen, B. 2012. Economic History and Economic Policy. The Journal of Economic History 72 (2): 289–307.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Eichengreen, B. 2014. Hall of Mirrors: The Great Depression, the Great Recession, and the Uses—And Misuses—Of History. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Einaudi, L. 1939. Del metodo nella storia delle dottrine. Rivista di storia economica 4 (3): 234–237.

    Google Scholar 

  • Einaudi, L. 1942–43. Economia di concorrenza e capitalism storico: la terzia via fra i secoli XVIII e XIX. Rivista di storia economica 7 (2): 49–72, 51–52.

    Google Scholar 

  • Einaudi, L. 2006. Economic Liberalism and Political Liberalism. In Luigi Einaudi: Selected Economic Essays, ed. L. Einaudi, R. Faucci, and R. Marchionatti, 73–79. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

    Google Scholar 

  • Einaudi, L. 2017. On Abstract and Historical Hypotheses and on Value Judgments in Economic Sciences, ed. P. Silvestri. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ekelund, R.B., and R.F. Hebert. 1997. A History of Economic Theory and Method, 4th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill.

    Google Scholar 

  • Evensky, J. 2015. Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations: A Reader’s Guide. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Facchinei, F. 1763. To Antonio Zaccaria, addendum to letter of 17 April, Archivo Histórico de la Casa de Loyola, Sanctuary of Loyola, Azpeitia, Spain, Fondo Zaccaria, b. 19, 1v.

    Google Scholar 

  • Fasting, M.C. 2014. Torkel Aschehoug and Norwegian Historical Economic Thought. London: Anthem.

    Google Scholar 

  • Faucci, R. 1986. Luigi Einaudi. Turin: UTET.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ferguson, N. 2016. Populism as a Backlash against Globalization—Historical Perspectives. Horizons. Center for International Relations and Sustainable Development, Belgrade, Serbia, No. 8. http://www.cirsd.org/en/horizons/horizons-autumn-2016–issue-no-8/populism-as-a-backlash-against-globalization.

  • Fisher, I. 1934. To the Members of the Econometric Society, 27 July and 1 August, Archivio Luigi Einaudi, busta 2, Fondazione Luigi Einaudi, Turin, Italy.

    Google Scholar 

  • Forte, F., and R. Marchionatti. 2012. Luigi Einaudi’s Economics of Liberalism. European Journal of the History of Economic Thought 19 (4): 587–624.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Fourcade, M., E. Ollion, and Y. Algan. 2015. The Superiority of Economics. Journal of Economic Perspectives 29 (1): 89–114.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Fredona, R., and S.A. Reinert. 2017. The Harvard Research Center in Entrepreneurial History and the Daimonic Entrepreneur. History of Political Economy 49 (2): 267–314.

    Google Scholar 

  • Friedman, M. 1953. The Methodology of Positive Economics. In Essays in Positive Economics, ed. M. Friedman, 3–43. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Galiani, F. 1770/1818. Letter to Louise d’Épinay, 28 April 1770. In Correspondance inédite de l’abbé Ferdinand Galiani, 2 vols. Paris: Treuttel and Würtz, 1818, p. 81.

    Google Scholar 

  • Galiani, F. 1770. Dialogues sur le commerce des blés. Paris: N.P.

    Google Scholar 

  • Galiani, F. 1979. La Bagarre: Galiani’sLostDialogue, ed. S.L. Kaplan. The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gay, E.F. 1941. The Tasks of Economic History. The Journal of Economic History 1 (Supplement): 9–16.

    Google Scholar 

  • Genovesi, A. 1764. Storia del commercio della Gran Brettagna scritta da John Cary…, 3 vols. Naples: Casari.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gioja, V. 1990. Gustav Schmoller: La scienza economica e la storia. Galatina: Congedo.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gragg, C.I. 1951. Because Wisdom Can’t Be Told. Harvard Business School Case No. 9-451-005.

    Google Scholar 

  • Grimmer-Solem, E. 2003. The Rise of Historical Economics and Social Reform in Germany 1864–1894. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Grimmer-Solem, E., and R. Romani. 1999. In Search of Full Empirical Reality: Historical Political Economy, 1870–1900. The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought 6 (3): 333–364.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Groenewegen, P. 2001. From Prominent Physician to Major Economist: Some Reflections on Quesnay’s Switch to Economics in the 1750s. In Physicians and Political Economy: Six Studies of the Work of Doctor-Economists, ed. P. Groenewegen, 93–115. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hagemann, H. 2016. Concluding Remarks. In The German Historical School and European Economic Thought, ed. J.L. Cardoso and M. Psalidopoulos, 223–235. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hall, S.S. 2010. Wisdom: From Philosophy to Neuroscience. New York: Knopf.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hamilton, A. 1791. Final Version of an Opinion on the Constitutionality of an Act to Establish a Bank [23 February]. In The Papers of Alexander Hamilton, ed. H.C. Syrett et al., 26 vols., vol. VIII, 97–134. New York: Columbia University Press, 1961–1987.

    Google Scholar 

  • Harari, Y.N. 2015. Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind. New York: Harper.

    Google Scholar 

  • Harcourt, G., and P. Kerr. 2009. Joan Robinson. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Harper, T.N. 2002. Empire, Diaspora, and the Languages of Globalism. In Globalization in World History, ed. A.G. Hopkins, 141–166. New York: W. W. Norton.

    Google Scholar 

  • Harrison, P. 2011. Adam Smith and the History of the Invisible Hand. Journal of the History of Ideas 72 (1): 29–49.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hayek, F.A. 1941. Letter to Joan Violet Robinson, 8 March 1941, Joan Violet Robinson Papers, Vii/194. Cambridge, UK: King’s College Archives.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hayek, F.A. 1954. History and Politics. In Capitalism and the Historians, ed. F.A. Hayek, 3–29. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hayek, F.A. 1978. The Primacy of the Abstract. In New Studies in Philosophy, Politics, Economics and the History of Ideas, ed. F.A. Hayek, 35–49. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.

    Google Scholar 

  • Heaton, H. 1952. Edwin F. Gay: A Scholar in Action. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Heilbronner, R. 1999. The Worldly Philosophers: The Lives, Times, and Ideas of the Great Economic Thinkers, 7th ed. New York: Touchstone.

    Google Scholar 

  • Heilperin, M.A. 1960. Studies in Economic Nationalism. Geneva: Droz.

    Google Scholar 

  • Herbst, J. 1965. The German Historical School in American Scholarship: A Study in the Transfer of Culture. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hodgson, G.M. 2001. How Economics Forgot History: The Problem of Historical Specificity in Social Science. London: Routledge.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Hodgson, G.M. 2004. The Evolution of Institutional Economics: Agency, Structure and Darwinism in American Institutionalism. London: Routledge.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Hodgson, G.M. 2009. Commentary: The Great Crash of 2008 and the Reform of Economics. Cambridge Journal of Economics 33 (6): 1205–1221.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hont, I. 2005. Jealousy of Trade: International Competition and the Nation-State in Historical Perspective. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hont, I. 2008. The ‘Rich Country-Poor Country’ Debate Revisited: The Irish Origins and French Reception of the Hume Paradox. In David Hume’s Political Economy, ed. C. Wennerlind and M. Schabas, 243–323. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hudson, P., and K. Tribe (eds.). 2017. The Contradictions of Capital in the Twenty-First Century: The Piketty Opportunity. New York: Columbia University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hume, D. 1739. A Treatise on Human Nature. London: John Noon.

    Google Scholar 

  • Innis, H.A. 1952. William T. Jackman, 1871–1951. The Canadian Journal of Economics and Political Science / Revue canadienne d’Economique et de Science politique 18 (2): 201–204.

    Google Scholar 

  • Isaac, J. 2012. Working Knowledge: Making the Human Sciences from Parsons to Kuhn. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Jackman, W.T. 1932. The Importance of Economic History. In Facts and Factors in Economic History: Articles by Former Students for Edwin Francis Gay, ed. A.H. Cole, A.L. Dunham, and N.S.B. Gras, 3–17. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • James, H. 2001. The End of Globalization: Lessons from the Great Depression. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • James, H. 2009. The Creation and Destruction of Value: The Globalization Cycle. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Johnson, C.A. 1982. MITI and the Japanese Miracle: The Growth of Industrial Policy, 1925–1975. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Judis, J.B. 2016. The Populist Explosion: How the Great Recession Transformed American and European Politics. New York: Columbia Global Reports.

    Google Scholar 

  • Juhász, R. 2014. Temporary Protection and Technology Adoption: Evidence from the Napoleonic Blockade. CEP Discussion Paper No. 1322.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kadish, A. 1989. Economic History and the Contraction of Economics. In Historians, Economists, and Economic History, ed. A. Kadish, 221–245. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kadish, A. 1993. The Teaching of Political Economy in the Extension Movement: Cambridge, London and Oxford. In The Market for Political Economy: The Advent of Economics in British University Culture, 1850–1905, ed. A. Kadish and K. Tribe, 78–110. London and New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kaplan, S.L. 2015a. Bread, Politics, and Political Economy in the Reign of Louis XV, 2nd ed. London: Anthem.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kaplan, S.L. 2015b. The Stakes of Regulation: Perspectives on ‘Bread, Politics, and Political Economy’ Forty Years Later. London: Anthem.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kaplan, S.L., and S.A. Reinert (eds.). 2018. The Economic Turn: Recasting Political Economy in Eighteenth-Century Europe. London: Anthem (forthcoming).

    Google Scholar 

  • Keynes, J.N. 1891. The Scope and Method of Political Economy. London: Macmillan.

    Google Scholar 

  • Keynes, J.M. 1919. Letter to Jan Christiaan Smuts, 27 November 1919. In The Collected Writings of John Maynard Keynes, ed. E. Johnson and D. Moggridge, 30 vols., London: Macmillan et al. for the Royal Economic Society, 1971–1989, vol. XVII, 7–8.

    Google Scholar 

  • Keynes, J.M. 1933. The Means to Prosperity. In The Collected Writings of John Maynard Keynes, ed. E. Johnson and D. Moggridge, 30 vols., London: Macmillan et al. for the Royal Economic Society, 1971–1989, vol. IX, 335–366.

    Google Scholar 

  • Keynes, J.M. 1936. The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money. In The Collected Writings of John Maynard Keynes, ed. E. Johnson and D. Moggridge, 30 vols., vol. VII, 381. London: Macmillan et al. for the Royal Economic Society, 1971–1989.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kolbert, E. 2014. The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History. New York: Henry Holt.

    Google Scholar 

  • Krueger, A.O., et al. 1991. Report of the Commission on Graduate Education in Economics. Journal of Economic Literature 29 (3): 1044–1045.

    Google Scholar 

  • Krugman, P. 1994. The Fall and Rise of Development Economics. In Rethinking the Development Experience: Essays Provoked by the Work of Albert O. Hirschman, ed. L. Rodwin and D.A. Schön, 39–58. Washington, DC and Cambridge, MA: The Brookings Institution and The Lincoln Institute of Land Policy.

    Google Scholar 

  • Krugman, P. 1995. Development, Geography, and Economic Theory. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kuhn, T. 1962. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • “League of Nationalists”. 2016. The Economist, November 17.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lincoln, E.E. 1932. Applied Economic History: Some Relations Between Economic History and Modern Business Management. In Facts and Factors in Economic History: Articles by Former Students for Edwin Francis Gay, ed. A.H. Cole, A.L. Dunham, and N.S.B. Gras, 640–665. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lindenfeld, D.F. 1993. The Myth of the Older German Historical School of Economics. Central European History 26 (4): 405–416.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • List, F. 1841. Das nationale System der politischen Öekonomie. Stuttgart and Tübingen: Cotta.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lynas, M. 2008. Six Degrees: Our Future on a Hotter Planet. New York: HarperCollins.

    Google Scholar 

  • Maas, H. 2014. Economic Methodology: A Historical Introduction. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Maddison, A. 2007. Contours of the World Economy 1-2030 AD: Essays in Macro-Economic History. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mankiw, N.G. 2014. Principles of Macroeconomics, 7th ed. Boston: Cengage.

    Google Scholar 

  • Maslow, A.H. 1966. The Psychology of Science: A Reconnaissance. New York: Joanna Cotler Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mattelart, A. 2000. Networking the World, 1794–2000, trans. L. Carey-Libbrecht and J.A. Cohen. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • McCloskey, D.N. 2006. The Bourgeois Virtues: Ethics for an Age of Commerce. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • McDaniel, I. 2018. The Politics of Historical Economics: Wilhelm Roscher on Democracy, Socialism and Caesarism. Modern Intellectual History 15 (1): 93–122.

    Google Scholar 

  • Meek, R.L. 1976. Social Science and the Ignoble Savage. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Meier, G.M., and J.E. Stiglitz (eds.). 2001. Frontiers of Development Economics: The Future in Perspective. Washington, DC and Oxford: The World Bank and Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mill, J.S. 1848. Principles of Political Economy. London: Longmans, Green, Reader, and Dyer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Milonakis, D., and B. Fine. 2009. From Political Economy to Economics: Method, the Social and the Historical in the Evolution of Economic Theory. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mishra, P. 2017. Age of Anger: A History of the Present. London: Allen Lane.

    Google Scholar 

  • Myrdal, G. 1957. Economic Theory and Under-Developed Countries. London: Duckworth.

    Google Scholar 

  • Myrdal, G. 1973. An Economist’s Vision of a Sane World. In Essays and Lectures, ed. M. Okada and G. Myrdal, 87–103. Kyoto: Keibunsha.

    Google Scholar 

  • Nakhimovsky, I. 2011. The Closed Commercial State: Perpetual Peace and Commercial Society from Rousseau to Fichte. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Nelson, R.H. 2014. Economics as Religion: From Samuelson to Chicago and Beyond, with a new epilogue. University Park: The Pennsylvania State University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Nietzsche, F. 1989. Thus Spake Zarathustra, trans. W. Kaufmann. London: Penguin.

    Google Scholar 

  • Nishizawa, T. 2003. Lujo Brentano, Alfred Marshall, and Tokuzo Fukuda: The Reception and Transformation of the German Historical School in Japan. In The German Historical School: The Historical and Ethical Approach to Economics, ed. Y. Shionoya, 155–172. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Novick, P. 1989. That Noble Dream: The “Objectivity Question” and the American Historical Profession. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Nye, J.V.C. 2007. War, Wine, and Taxes: The Political Economy of Anglo-French Trade, 1689–1900. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • O’Rourke, K.H. 2016. The Great Depression of the 1930s and the World Economic Crisis After 2008. In A History of the Global Economy: 1500 to the Present, ed. J. Baten, 110–114. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • O’Rourke, K.H., and J.G. Williamson. 1999. Globalization and History: The Evolution of a Nineteenth-Century Atlantic Economy. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Orwell, G. (1981). Looking Back on the Spanish Civil War. In id., A Collection of Essays, 188–209. San Diego: Harcourt Brace.

    Google Scholar 

  • Osterhammel, J. 2014. The Transformation of the World: A Global History of the Nineteenth Century. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • O’Toole, G. 2014. History Does Not Repeat Itself, But It Rhymes. http://quoteinvestigator.com/2014/01/12/history-rhymes/.

  • Palepu, K., and T. Khanna. 2010. Winning in Emerging Markets: A Road Map for Strategy and Execution. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Palmieri, F. 2016. State of Nature, Stages of Society: Enlightenment Conjectural History and Modern Social Discourse. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Pearson, H. 1999. Was There Really a German Historical School of Economics? History of Political Economy 31 (3): 547–562.

    Google Scholar 

  • Perez, C. 2003. Technological Revolutions and Financial Capital: The Dynamics of Bubbles and Golden Ages. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

    Google Scholar 

  • Peukert, H. 2001. The Schmoller Renaissance. History of Political Economy 22 (1): 71–116.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Piketty, T. 2014. Capital in the Twenty-First Century, trans. A. Goldhammer. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pincus, S. 2009. 1688: The First Modern Revolution. New Haven: Yale University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pomeranz, K. 2000. The Great Divergence: China, Europe, and the Making of the Modern World. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pozzetti, P. 1810. La vita letteraria di Giuseppe Belcivenni, già Pelli. Giornale scientifico e letterario dell’Accademia italiana di scienze lettere ed arti, vol. II, 93–107. Pisa: Stamperia del giornale.

    Google Scholar 

  • Priddat, B.P. 1995. Die andere Ökonomie: Eine neue Einschätzung von Gustav Schmollers Versuch einer “ethisch-historischen” Nationalökonomie im 19. Jahrhundert. Marburg: Metropolis.

    Google Scholar 

  • Quesnay, F. 1730. Observations sur les effets de la saignée. Paris: Osmont.

    Google Scholar 

  • Quiggin, J. 2012. Zombie Economics: How Dead Ideas Still Walk Among Us, new ed. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rees, M. 2003. Our Final Century? Will the Human Race Survive the Twenty-First Century? London: Heinemann.

    Google Scholar 

  • Reinert, E.S. 1999. The Role of the State in Economic Growth. Journal of Economic Studies 26 (4/5): 268–326.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Reinert, E.S. 2007. How Rich Countries Got Rich… And Why Poor Countries Stay Poor. London: Constable.

    Google Scholar 

  • Reinert, E.S. 2011. The Technological Dynamics of Capitalism: A Note on Antiphysiocracy, Colbertism, and 1848 Moments. In Physiocracy, Antiphysiocracy and Pfeiffer, ed. J.G. Backhaus, 23–38. Berlin: Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Reinert, E.S. 2016. Antonio Serra and the Problems of Today. In Antonio Serra and the Economics of Good Government, ed. R. Patalano and S.A. Reinert, 325–361. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

    Google Scholar 

  • Reinert, E.S., R. Kattel, and J. Ghosh (eds.). 2016. Handbook of Alternative Theories of Economic Development. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

    Google Scholar 

  • Reinert, S.A. 2010. Lessons on the Rise and Fall of Great Powers: Conquest, Commerce, and Decline in Enlightenment Italy. The American Historical Review 115 (5): 1395–1425.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Reinert, S.A. 2011. Translating Empire: Emulation and the Origins of Political Economy. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Reinert, S.A. 2015. The Economy of Fear: H.P. Lovecraft on Eugenics, Economics and the Great Depression. Horror Studies 6 (2): 255–282.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Reinert, S.A. 2016. Authority and Expertise at the Origins of Macro-Economics. In Antonio Serra and the Economics of Good Government, ed. R. Patalano and S.A. Reinert, 112–142. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

    Google Scholar 

  • Robertson, J. 2005. The Case for the Enlightenment: Scotland and Naples, 1680–1760. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Robinson, J.V. 1978. “History versus Equilibrium,” Joan Violet Robinson Papers, King’s College Archives, Cambridge, United Kingdom, JVR/iii/14.1, p. 4, a version of her paper by the same name in id., Contributions to Modern Economics, 126–136. New York: Academic Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rodrik, D. 2016. Economics Rules: The Rights and Wrongs of the Dismal Science. New York: W. W. Norton.

    Google Scholar 

  • Röpke, W. 1942. Die Gesellschaftskrisis der Gegenwart. Erlenbach-Zurich: Eugen Rentsch Verlag.

    Google Scholar 

  • Romani, R. 2004. Hayek and Historical Political Economy. History of Economic Ideas 12 (1): 37–65.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rosenberg, E.S. 2012. A World Connecting, 1870–1945. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rosenfeld, S.A. 2011. Common Sense: A Political History. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Rutherford, M. 2011. The Institutional Movement in American Economics, 1918–1947: Science and Social Control. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Samuels, W.J., M.F. Johnson, and W.H. Perry. 2011. Erasing the Invisible Hand: Essays on an Elusive and Misused Concept in Economics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Schefold, B. 1999. The Afterglow of the German Historical School, 1945–1960. In Economics, Welfare Policy and the History of Economic Thought: Essays in Honour of Arnold Heertje, ed. M.M.G. Fase, W. Kanning, and D.A. Walker, 378–391. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

    Google Scholar 

  • Schlefer, J. 2012. The Assumptions Economists Make. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Schumpeter, J.A. 1996. A History of Economic Analysis, ed. E.B. Schumpeter with a new introduction by M. Perlman. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Semmel, B. 1970. The Rise of Free Trade Imperialism: Classical Political Economy, the Empire of Free Trade, and Imperialism, 1750–1850. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Serra, A. 1613/2011. A Short Treatise on the Wealth and Poverty of Nations (1613), trans. J. Hunt, edited and with an introduction by S.A. Reinert. London: Anthem.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sheehan, J., and D. Wahrman. 2015. Invisible Hands: Self-Organization and the Eighteenth Century. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Shionoya, Y. 2005. The Soul of the German Historical School: Methodological Essays on Schmoller, Weber and Schumpeter. Boston: Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Shovlin, J. 2007. The Political Economy of Virtue: Luxury, Patriotism, and the Origins of the French Revolution. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Silvestri, P. 2017. “Introduction” to L. Einaudi. In On Abstract and Historical Hypotheses and on Value Judgments in Economic Sciences, ed. P. Silvestri, 1–33. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Skidelsky, R. 1983–2000. John Maynard Keynes, 3 vols. London: Penguin.

    Google Scholar 

  • Skidelsky, R. 2009. Keynes: The Return of the Master. London: Allen Lane.

    Google Scholar 

  • Skinner, Q. 1997. Liberty Before Liberalism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Smith, A. 1776/1976. An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, 2 vols. in one, ed. E. Cannan. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Smith, A. 2015. The Wealth of Nations: A Translation into Modern English, trans. L.F. Abbot. Manchester: Industrial Systems Research.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sonenscher, M. 2009. Before the Deluge: Public Debt, Inequality, and the Intellectual Origins of the French Revolution. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Stepan, A., J.J. Linz, and Y. Yadav. 2011. Crafting State-Nations: India and Other Multinational Democracies. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sugiyama, C., and H. Mizuta (eds.). 1988. Enlightenment and Beyond: Political Economy Comes to Japan. Tokyo: University of Tokyo Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sunna, C., and D. Gualerzi (eds.). 2016. Development Economics in the Twenty-First Century. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tagliacozzo, G. 1969. Economic Vichianism: Vico, Galiani, Croce – Economics, Economic Liberalism. In Giambattista Vico: An International Symposium, ed. G. Tagliacozzo, 349–368. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Taleb, N.N. 2007. The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable. New York: Random House.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tribe, K. 1988. Governing Economy: The Reformation of German Economic Discourse, 1750–1840. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tribe, K. 1995. ‘Die Vernunft des List’: National economy and the critique of cosmopolitan economy. In Strategies of Economic Order: German Economic Discourse, 1750–1950, 32–65. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tribe, K. 2002. Historical Schools of Economics: German and English. Keele Economics Research Papers, no. 2. This is an extended version of his ‘Historical Schools of Economics: German and English’. In A Companion to the History of Economic Thought, ed. W.J. Samuels, J.E. Biddle, and J. Davis, 215–230. Oxford: Blackwell, 2003.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tribe, K. 2015. The Economy of the Word: Language, History, and Economics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Vico, G. 1725–28/1944. Autobiography, trans. M.H. Fisch and T.G. Bergin. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Vico, G. 1744/1984. The New Science, trans. T.G. Bergin and M.H. Fisch. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Vico, G. 1708–9/1990. On the Study Methods of Our Time, trans. E. Gianturco. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Viner, J. 1963. The Economist in History. In Essays on the Intellectual History of Economics, ed. D.A. Irwin and J. Viner, 226–247. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1991.

    Google Scholar 

  • Viner, J. 1977. The Role of Providence in the Social Order: An Essay in Intellectual History. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wade, R. 2003. Governing the Market: Economic Theory and the Role of Government in East Asian Industrialization, with a new introduction. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wakefield, A. 2009. The Disordered Police State: German Cameralism as Science and Practice. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Watson, A.J. 2007. Marginal Man: The Dark Vision of Harold Innis. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Weintraub, E.R. 2002. How Economics Became a Mathematical Science. Durham: Duke University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Wendler, E. 2015. Friedrich List (1789–1846): A Visionary Economist with Social Responsibility, with an introduction by H. Köhler. Berlin: Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wenzlhuemer, R. 2013. Connecting the Nineteenth-Century World: The Telegraph and Globalization. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Whatmore, R. 2015. What is Intellectual History? Cambridge: Polity.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wilde, O. 1891/2001. The Soul of Man Under Socialism. In The Soul of Man Under Socialism & Selected Critical Prose, ed. L. Dowling and O. Wilde, 125–160. London: Penguin.

    Google Scholar 

  • Williamson, J.G. 2011. Trade and Poverty: When the Third World Fell Behind. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Wilson, B. 2016. Heyday: The 1850s and the Dawn of the Global Age. New York: Basic Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Winch, D. 2002. Does Progress Matter? In Is there Progress in Economics? Knowledge, Truth and the History of Economic Thought. ed. S. Boehm, et al., 3–20. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

    Google Scholar 

  • Woo-Cumings, M. 1999. The Developmental State. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Yanagisawa, O. 2003. The Impact of German Economic Thought on Japanese Economists Before World War II. In The German Historical School: The Historical and Ethical Approach to Economics, ed. Y. Shionoya, 173–187. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Sophus A. Reinert .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Copyright information

© 2018 The Author(s)

About this chapter

Check for updates. Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Reinert, S.A. (2018). Historical Political Economy. In: Cardinale, I., Scazzieri, R. (eds) The Palgrave Handbook of Political Economy. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-44254-3_5

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-44254-3_5

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, London

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-137-44253-6

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-137-44254-3

  • eBook Packages: Economics and FinanceEconomics and Finance (R0)

Publish with us

Policies and ethics