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‘Peddling’ Et dukkehjem: The Role of the State

  • Julie Holledge
  • Jonathan Bollen
  • Frode Helland
  • Joanne Tompkins
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Performance and Technology book series (PSPT)

Abstract

This chapter investigates three ways in which Norway has contributed to shaping the play’s production history. The first pattern maps the touring trajectories of the early Nordic Noras, who created a major interpretative tradition. The second shows the regional and global flows of Nordic artists and productions from 1914 to 1990. Unbroken artistic networks of artists link these tours back to the premiere of the play in 1879: this degree of artistic interconnection is unprecedented in the study of a single play. The third group of patterns comes from maps showing the post-1990 global distribution of the play. These touring circuits are extensive and have been developed through a series of initiatives put in place by the Norwegian government.

Keywords

Gender Equality National Culture Norwegian Institution Production History Performance Tradition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julie Holledge
    • 1
  • Jonathan Bollen
    • 2
  • Frode Helland
    • 1
  • Joanne Tompkins
    • 3
  1. 1.Centre for Ibsen StudiesUniversity of OsloOsloNorway
  2. 2.School of the Arts and MediaUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia
  3. 3.Humanities and Social SciencesUniversity of QueenslandSt LuciaAustralia

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