Skip to main content

The Archive as Blueprint: Information in Mass Dictatorships

  • 1053 Accesses

Abstract

The most obvious thing to say about knowledge management under totalitarian conditions would be that information is centralized, censorship is systematic and realist aesthetics is institutionalized. The present essay attempts not only to unravel the logic of the interconnectedness of the above-mentioned features, but seeks to explore the understanding of information, its definition, role and organization in socialist regimes. Instead of describing the structures of censorship or surveillance, it attempts to theorize the relationship of their different agencies to what counts as information, to its objectivity and reliability.

Keywords

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
eBook
USD   169.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as EPUB and PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
Hardcover Book
USD   219.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Durable hardcover edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Learn about institutional subscriptions

References

  • Arendt, H. (1975). The origins of totalitarianism, New ed. with added prefaces. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

    Google Scholar 

  • Barnes, S. (2011). Death and redemption. The gulag and the shaping of soviet society. Princeton/Oxford: Princeton University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bathrick, D. (1995). The powers of speech: The politics of culture in the GDR. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bauer, T. (1983). The Hungarian alternative to soviet-type planning. Journal of Comparative Economics, 7, 304–316.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Beer, D. (2008). Renovating Russia: The human sciences and the fate of liberal modernity, 1880–1930. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Beissinger, M. R. (1988). Scientific management, socialist discipline, and soviet power. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Blum, A., & Mespoulet, M. (2003). L’anarchie bureaucratique. Pouvoir et statistique sous Staline. Paris: Éditions La Découverte.

    Google Scholar 

  • Cassiday, J. A. (2000). The enemy on trial: Early Soviet courts on stage and screen. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Connor, W. D., & Gitelman, Z. Y. (1977). Public opinion in European socialist systems. New York: Praeger.

    Google Scholar 

  • Davies, S. (1997). Popular opinion in Stalin’s Russia: Terror, propaganda, and dissent, 1934–1941. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Day, R. D. (2001). The modern invention of information. Discourse, history and power. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Depretto, J.-P. (2002). Pour une histoire sociale de la dictature soviétique. In: Depretto, J.-P. (Ed.), Pouvoirs et société en Union Soviétique. (pp, 3–18). Les Editions de l’Atelier: les Ed. Ouvrières, Paris.

    Google Scholar 

  • Epstein, M. (1995). The origins and meaning of Russian postmodernism. In M. Epstein (Ed.), After the future. The paradoxes of postmodernism and contemporary Russian culture (pp. 188–210). Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Falk, B. J. (2003). The dilemmas of dissidence in East-Central Europe. Citizen intellectuals and philosopher kings. Budapest: CEU Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Fitzpatrick, S. (1992). The cultural front. Power and culture in revolutionary Russia. Ithaca-London: Cornell University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Fitzpatrick, S. (1997). Signals from below: Soviet letters of denunciations during the 1930s. In S. Fitzpatrick & R. Gellately (Eds.), Accusatory practices: Denunciation in modern European history, 1789–1989 (pp. 85–120). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hellbeck, J. (2009). Revolution on my mind. Writing a diary under Stalin. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Holquist, P. (2003). State violence as technique. The logic of violence in Soviet totalitarianism. In A. Weiner (Ed.), Landscaping the human garden: Twentieth century population management in comparative perspective (pp. 19–46). Stanford: Stanford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kagarlitsky, B., & Dauzat, P.-E. (1993). Les Intellectuels et l’État soviétique: de 1917 à nos jours. Presses Universitaires de France, Paris.

    Google Scholar 

  • Khelevniuk, O. V. (2004). The history of the Gulag. From collectivization to great terror, (trans: Staklo, Vadim A.). New Haven/London: Yale University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lebow, K. A. (1999). Revising the Politicized Landscape Nowa Huta, 1949–1957. City & Society 11, 165–187.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lemov, R. (2009). Towards a data base of dreams: Assembling an archive of elusive materials, c. 1947–61. History Workshop Journal, 67, 44–68.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Macrea-Toma, I. (2009). Privilighentsia. Instituţii literare în comunismul românesc. Cluj-Napoca: Casa Cărţii de Ştiinţă.

    Google Scholar 

  • Papazian, E. A. (2009). Manufacturing truth: The documentary moment in early Soviet culture. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Shearer, D. (2004). Elements near and Alien: Passportization, policing, and identity in the Stalinist state, 1932–1952. The Journal of Modern History, 76(4), 835–881.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Shlapentokh, V. (1986). Soviet public opinion and ideology: Mythology and pragmatism in interaction. New York: Praeger.

    Google Scholar 

  • Valtchinova, G. (2009). Between ordinary pain and extraordinary knowledge, the seer vanga in the everyday lives of Bulgarians during socialism (1960s–1970s). Aspasia, 3, 106–130.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Verdery, K. (2014). Secrets and truths: Ethnography in the archive of Romania’s secret police. Budapest: CEU Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Werth, N. (1994). Une source inédite : les svodki de la Tchéka-OGPU. Revue des études slaves, 66, 17–27.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Yurchak, A. (2006). Everything was forever, until it was no more: The last Soviet generation. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Zarestskaia-Balsente, I. (2000). Les Intellectuels et la censure en URSS (1965–1985). De la verité allégorique à l’erosion du système. Paris: L’Harmattan.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Ioana Macrea-Toma .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Copyright information

© 2016 The Author(s)

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Macrea-Toma, I. (2016). The Archive as Blueprint: Information in Mass Dictatorships. In: Corner, P., Lim, JH. (eds) The Palgrave Handbook of Mass Dictatorship. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-43763-1_12

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-43763-1_12

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, London

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-137-43762-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-137-43763-1

  • eBook Packages: HistoryHistory (R0)

Publish with us

Policies and ethics