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Battling in a Bleak Environment: The New Zealand Context for Partnership

  • Helen Delaney
  • Nigel Haworth
Chapter

Abstract

Support for partnership survives in New Zealand, but only just. Its survival is remarkable because of the impact of legislative changes and the post-1984 reform period. In this chapter, we argue that the impact of the early employment relations (ER) legislation, in conjunction with political and economic developments, constrained the emergence of broader patterns of industrial democracy and partnership. Put in a different way, the very success of the ER model imposed by the legislation limited the space and opportunity for different forms of employee voice to emerge in parallel with the institutions of award-based collective bargaining. In the mid-1980s, a neoliberal reform model was introduced in New Zealand, bringing with it new ER legislation and crowding out much of the space in which partnership might have developed.

Keywords

Trade Union Union Density Labour Market Reform Lean Management Industrial Democracy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helen Delaney
    • 1
  • Nigel Haworth
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Management and International BusinessThe University of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand

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