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The Manufacture of Consensus: The Development of United Nations Technical Guidance on Sexuality Education

  • Ekua Yankah
  • Peter Aggleton
Chapter

Abstract

Throughout much of the twentieth century, there has been debate about the best form that sexuality education might take. The end of the 2000s saw the development of no less than four sets of guidelines intended to signal some form of consensus. In this chapter, we review something of this chequered history: looking at the debates that took place in relation to the development of the UNESCO guidelines, the principal actors involved, and the manner in which a degree of shared perspective and ‘consensus’ came to be achieved. Present guidelines, while marking an advance over the past, highlight the ‘seriously unfinished’ nature of this work, as patterns of heterosexual ‘coupling’ and relationships diversify, and as issues of gender and sexual diversity come more firmly to the fore.

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Other Relevant Documents

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Open Access This chapter is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License, which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited.

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ekua Yankah
    • 1
  • Peter Aggleton
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Social Research on HealthUNSW AustraliaKensingtonAustralia

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