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(Im)politeness and Gender

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The Palgrave Handbook of Linguistic (Im)politeness

Abstract

This chapter maps out key developments in gender and (Im)politeness scholarship, focusing on theories and concepts which have advanced the field and contributed to its theoretical and methodological sophistication. The authors chronologically catalogue the most seminal work, highlighting the significant role that gender has played in politeness research since its inception. Aiming to facilitate innovative approaches in contemporary research, the chapter also presents specific examples of recent case studies which shed light on how the interdependencies between (Im)politeness, gender and identities can be productively explored. The chapter concludes with an overview of avenues for future research, shedding light on underinvestigated topics such as intersectionality and diversifying the field to examine gender and (Im)politeness in a much broader range of languages and cultures.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    At the time of writing, there have been over 1000 citations of this work.

  2. 2.

    It is worth noting Lakoff’s view that politeness is the result of an evaluation, as this is also assumed in later works on gender and (im)politeness.

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Correspondence to Malgorzata Chalupnik .

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Chalupnik, M., Christie, C., Mullany, L. (2017). (Im)politeness and Gender. In: Culpeper, J., Haugh, M., Kádár, D. (eds) The Palgrave Handbook of Linguistic (Im)politeness. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-37508-7_20

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-37508-7_20

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