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The Gaze of the Other: Postcolonial Theory and Organizational Analysis

  • Anshuman Prasad

Abstract

In the year 1496, the Portuguese seafarer Vasco da Gama set out on a long and arduous journey. Sailing down the western coast of Africa, he rounded the Cape of Good Hope on the southern tip of the continent, entered the Indian Ocean, and eventually landed at the port city of Calicut. According to a well-known story (cf. Sprinker, 1995: 2), when asked why da Gama and his men had come to India, they replied: “We seek Christians and spices.” Four years before da Gama embarked on his perilous search for spices and Christians, a Genoese sailor, Christopher Columbus, had obtained a royal warrant from Spain—and venture capital from financiers in Genoa—and had journeyed across the Atlantic in search of Oriental gold1 and the opulent kingdom of the great Khan of Cathay. As we know, he never made it that far.

Keywords

Organizational Analysis Organizational Phenomenon Postcolonial Theory Colonial Discourse Western Colonialism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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