The Academic Book of the Future and the Need to Break Boundaries

  • Jenny McCall
  • Amy Bourke-Waite

Abstract

Market research demonstrates that scholars’ attitudes towards monographs are changing, and that there is appetite for a shorter monograph form. The introduction of mid-length research format Palgrave Pivot in 2012 has proved that such a venture can be successful, and that more flexibility and speed may hold the key to the academic book of the future in humanities and social science research. In this chapter Jenny McCall, Global Head of Humanities at Palgrave Macmillan, and Amy Bourke-Waite, Senior Communications Manager at Palgrave Macmillan, consider the demand for Palgrave Pivot and similar mid-length offerings from academic publishers, the reception they have received from the academic community, and where we might go from here.

Keywords

academic publishers market research mid-length offering Palgrave Pivot print on demand publishing speed shorter monograph form 

Notes

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    Vulpes Libris (2015) ‘Palgrave Pivot: Mopping Up the Mid-Length Manuscripts’, Vulpes Libres blog, https://vulpeslibris.wordpress.com/2015/04/29/palgrave-pivot-mopping-up-the-mid-length-manuscripts/, accessed 20 August 2015.Google Scholar
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    L. Cassuto (12 August 2013) ‘The Rise of the Mini-Monograph’, The Chronicle of Higher Education, http://chronicle.com/article/The-Rise-of-the-MiniMonograph/141007/, accessed 20 August 2015.Google Scholar
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    B. Page (30 July 2015) ‘Goldsmiths to Launch “Inventive” University Press’, The Bookseller, http://www.thebookseller.com/news/goldsmiths-launchinventive-university-press-308334, accessed 20 August 2015.Google Scholar
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    J. Wolf Thomson (2002) ‘The Death of the Scholarly Monograph in the Humanities? Citation Patterns in Literary Scholarship’, Libri 52: 121–36.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Jenny McCall and Amy Bourke-Waite 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jenny McCall
  • Amy Bourke-Waite

There are no affiliations available

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