Intimate-Partner Violence within the Queensland Transgender Community: Barriers to Accessing Services and Seeking Help

  • Natasha Papazian
  • Matthew Ball

Abstract

Intimate-partner violence, also known as domestic violence, can be defined as ‘any pattern of behaviour within an intimate relationship used to coerce, dominate or isolate; the exertion of any form of power that maintains control’ (Dolan-Soto 2001: 1). To date, much of the research that has explored this issue has focused on cisgender, heterosexual women’s experiences of intimate-partner violence, with the effect that these experiences have shaped our understandings of this violence and much of the social policy implemented to address it (Ball & Hayes 2010: 163). This can mean that, at times, the experiences of others are overlooked. Two such overlooked groups include gay and lesbian victims and perpetrators, and transgender victims and perpetrators.1 While in recent years, criminological research has developed more interest in the experiences of gay and lesbian victims of intimate-partner violence, it has paid limited attention to the issue of transgender intimate-partner violence (Bornstein et al. 2006; Pitts et al. 2006; Leonard et al. 2008).

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Notes

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© Natasha Papazian and Matthew Ball 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Natasha Papazian
  • Matthew Ball

There are no affiliations available

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