Overcoming Veneer Theory: Animal Sympathy

  • Jim Garrison

Abstract

Ethics concerns right relationship with others and the world around us. I want to suggest that sympathy as found in all primates is the primordial origin of human ethics. Darwinian continuity establishes an inti-mate relationship between humans and other animals: Human nature is a part of nature as a whole. Recognizing this relationship is a worthy educational ideal; it helps curb excessive anthropocentrism by putting us in our proper place.

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© Jim Garrison 2016

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  • Jim Garrison

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