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Trajectories of Cybercrime

  • Russell G. Smith
Part of the Palgrave Macmillan’s Studies in Cybercrime and Cybersecurity book series (PSCYBER)

Abstract

This chapter is a condensed and revised version of the author’s earlier work (Smith 2010b), “The Development of Cybercrime: An Opportunity Theory Approach,” originally published in Crime Over Time, edited by Robyn Lincoln and Shirleene Robinson (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Newcastle upon Tyne). It is included in the current collection with permission.

Keywords

Cloud Computing Crime Prevention Money Laundering Organize Crime Group Online Banking 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Russell G. Smith 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Russell G. Smith

There are no affiliations available

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