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Utilizing Curriculum Renewal as a Way of Leading Cultural Change in Australian Health Professional Education

  • Roger Dunston
  • Dawn Forman
  • Lynda Matthews
  • Pam Nicol
  • Rosalie Pockett
  • Gary Rogers
  • Carole Steketee
  • Jill Thistlethwaite

Abstract

Health systems globally are engaged with major reforms focused on the need to deliver more responsive, effective and sustainable health services. Interprofessional practice (IPP), and the development of interprofessional educational (IPE) targeted at enabling IPP, sit at the heart of many of these reforms. IPP enabled by IPE could be argued as the practice foundation for achieving new and more effective forms of health service provision and health professional practice (World Health Organization, 2010; Gittell et al., 2013).

Keywords

Health Workforce Curriculum Development Institutional Delivery National Approach Collaborative Practice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Roger Dunston, Dawn Forman, Lynda Matthews, Pam Nicol, Rosalie Pockett, Gary Rogers, Carole Steketee and Jill Thistlethwaite 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roger Dunston
    • 1
  • Dawn Forman
    • 1
  • Lynda Matthews
    • 1
  • Pam Nicol
    • 1
  • Rosalie Pockett
    • 1
  • Gary Rogers
    • 1
  • Carole Steketee
    • 1
  • Jill Thistlethwaite
    • 1
  1. 1.Australia

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