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From Revival to Revolution: Thomas MacDonagh and the Irish Review

  • Kurt Bullock
Part of the New Directions in Irish and Irish American Literature book series (NDIIAL)

Abstract

In Irish Literary Magazines: An Outline History and Descriptive Bibliography (2003), Tom Clyde registers the Irish Review under the classification of “political revival” rather than literary or cultural revival.1 His categorization is intriguing, given that the March 1911 banner of the first issue of the Irish Review (1911–1914) declared the monthly journal a periodical of “Irish literature, art and science.” The “Introduction” to that issue furthermore proclaimed the Irish Review to be “founded to give expression to the intellectual movement in Ireland” and boldly asserted that it would favor no political party.2 Its roll call of authors during nearly four years of publication indicated its revivalist intentions, claiming the likes of George Moore, William Butler Yeats, George Russell [AE], Francis Sheehy Skeffington, Daniel Corkery, Katherine Tynan, James Cousins, Douglas Hyde, and Oliver St. John Gogarty. A regular contribution in Irish from Padraic Pearse attested to the journal’s interest in Gaelic restoration; illustrations supplied by, among other noted artists, William Orpen and Jack Yeats confirmed its revivalist breadth beyond the literary. Although the core group behind the Irish Review ’s founding—David Houston, James Stephens, Padraic Colum, Mary Maguire [Colum], and Thomas MacDonagh—were relative newcomers to the literary scene, Mary Colum notes that “the older and established men of letters did not want to be brushed aside by obstreperous youth in a new Irish periodical; they were bent on sending in their contributions.”3 Houston, as owner and initial editor, modeled his periodical upon the New Ireland Review, the staff organ of University College Dublin (UCD) that reported on literary, political, social, and economic affairs and, not coincidentally, ceased publication one month prior to the first issue of the Irish Review.

Keywords

Editorial Policy Recent Performance Cultural Nationalism Contemporary Review Land Purchase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Karen Steele and Michael de Nie 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kurt Bullock

There are no affiliations available

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