Conclusion: The Residual Spirituality in Critical Theory: A Case for Affirmative Postsecular Politics

  • Rosi Braidotti

Abstract

The highly politicized context in which issues linked to religion in the public sphere are being discussed, in Europe and elsewhere in the world today, raises a number of questions that go beyond the study of religion itself. Throughout this volume, the issue of the postsecular has been addressed as one of the defining features of the material and discursive conditions that structure our social context. The starting assumption for this volume was the determination to disrupt the dominant equation between Christianity and secularism, so as to open up new spaces for critical theory. Stathis Gourgouris put it admirably: ‘the ultimate point is not merely to disrupt the antinomic complicity between the religious and the secular, but to take away from the religious the agency of determining what is secular’ (Gourgouris, 2013: 62).

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© Rosi Braidotti 2014

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  • Rosi Braidotti

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