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Strategic Interaction: Global Times and the Main Melody

  • Kingsley Edney
Part of the Asia Today book series (ASIAT)

Abstract

Propaganda strategy is the Party-state’s broad, long-term approach to propaganda. Propaganda strategy is used by the Party-state to maintain its ability to exercise power through propaganda practices in response to changes in the context in which that exercise of power takes place. The environment in which discourse is publicly articulated in China has undergone a dramatic transformation since the beginning of the period of reform and opening. Although this has altered the conditions under which the Party-state attempts to use propaganda practices to exercise power, the Party-state’s flexible response to these changes has allowed it to continue to exercise power over other actors in this area.

Keywords

Public Opinion News Article News Medium Strategic Interaction Media Outlet 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© Kingsley Edney 2014

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  • Kingsley Edney

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