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Moving Between the ‘Inner Circle’ and the ‘Outer Circle’: The Limited Impact of Think Tanks on Policy Making in China

  • Quansheng Zhao
Chapter
Part of the Asan-Palgrave Macmillan Series book series (APMS)

Abstract

Following the exhaustive chapter by Bonnie Glaser detailing the world of think tanks, this chapter focuses on their impact on the policy-making process in China, exploring “limited interactions between the inner circle and the outer circle” to characterize this relationship. Special attention is paid to the channels between the policy makers and think tanks.

Keywords

Foreign Policy Chinese Communist Party Policy Community Outer Circle Epistemic Community 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© The Asan Institute for Policy Studies 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Quansheng Zhao

There are no affiliations available

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