Advertisement

Chinese Foreign Policy Research Institutes and the Practice of Influence

  • Bonnie S. Glaser
Chapter
Part of the Asan-Palgrave Macmillan Series book series (APMS)

Abstract

In the Maoist era, Chinese leaders had little need for foreign policy advice due to China’s limited involvement in the international community and to the ideological, personalistic, and top-down pattern of decisionmaking under Mao Zedong. The launching of Deng Xiaoping’s reform and opening-up policy in the late 1970s marked the beginning of a process of gradual transformation of Chinese foreign policy from ideology to pragmatism, and from self-exclusion and passivity to greater involvement and active participation in international affairs. The vigorous conduct of diplomacy with 171 countries with which China today has diplomatic ties and in numerous regional and international organizations, combined with the rapid expansion of Chinese interests around the globe, have exponentially increased the Chinese leadership’s need for information, analysis, and advice about the outside world to safeguard and advance Chinese national interests. One of the important means by which this need has been met is through the system of Chinese foreign policy research institutes.

Keywords

Foreign Policy Chinese Communist Party Chinese Leader Informal Channel Chinese Foreign Policy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. 1.
    Prior articles on Chinese think tanks include: the entire issue of The China Quarterly 171 (September 2002); Zhu Xufeng, “The Influence of the Think Tanks in the Chinese Policy Process,” Asian Survey 49, no. 2 (2009): 333–357; Zhu Xufeng, “China’s Think Tanks: Roles and Characteristics,” EAI Background Brief No. 306, October 19, 2006; Cheng Li, “China’s New Think Tanks: Where Officials, Entrepreneurs, and Scholars Interact,” China Leadership Monitor 29;CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Evan S. Medeiros, “Agents of Influence: Assessing the Role of Chinese Foreign Policy Research Organizations After the 16th Party Congress,” in Andrew Scobell and Larry Wortzel (eds.), Civil-Military Change in China: Elites, Institutes, and Ideas After the 16th Party Congress (Carlisle, PA: Strategic Studies Institute, Army War College, 2004), 279–307; Thomas Bondiguel and Thierry Kellner, “The Impact of China’s Foreign Policy Think Tanks,” BICCS Asia Paper 5, no. 5 (2010);Google Scholar
  3. He Li, “The Role of Think Tanks in Chinese Foreign Policy,” Problems of Post-Communism 49, no. 2 (March/April 2002): 33–43;Google Scholar
  4. and Zhu Xufeng and Xue Lan, “Think Tanks in Transitional China,” Public Administration and Development 27 (2007): 452–464.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 12.
    Shi Chunlai and Xu Jian, “Preventive Diplomacy Pertinent to the Asia-Pacific,” International Review 4 (July 1997). The “new security concept” was introduced in December 1997 at the Third CSCAP North Pacific Meeting by China’s Ambassador Shi Chunlai. See Alastair lain Johnston, “Socialization in International Institutions: The ASEAN Way and International Relations Theory,” in G. John Ikenberry and Michael Mastaduno (eds.), International Relations Theory and the Asia-Pacific (New York: Columbia University Press, 2003), 129.Google Scholar
  6. 13.
    Bonnie Glaser and Evan Medeiros, “The Changing Ecology of Foreign Policymaking in China: The Ascension and Demise of the Theory of ‘Peaceful Rise’,” China Quarterly 190 (2007): 291–310.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 25.
    Thomas Bondiguel and Thierry Kellner, “The Impact of China’s Foreign Policy Think Tanks,” BICCS Asia Paper 5, no. 5(2010): 22.Google Scholar
  8. 27.
    Thomas Bondiguel and Thierry Kellner, “The Impact of China’s Foreign Policy Think Tanks,” BICCS Asia Paper 5, no. 5(2010): 20–21.Google Scholar
  9. 39.
    In a survey conducted by Zhu Xufeng, nearly all think tanks received pishi fewer than five times annually. “The Influence of Think Tanks in the Chinese Policy Process,” Asian Survey 49, no. 2 (2009): 344.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Asan Institute for Policy Studies 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bonnie S. Glaser

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations