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The Foreign Aid Philosophy of a Rising Asian Power: A Southeast Asian View

  • Dennis D. Trinidad

Abstract

The international aid activities of The People’s Republic of China (hereinafter, China) have spanned over six decades. The year 2012 marked the 62nd anniversary of China’s foreign aid. Thus, it can hardly be considered an ‘emerging donor’, as some scholars have suggested. In fact, China has a longer experience of aid-giving than some of the traditional donors from the Development Assistance Committee of the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (DAC/OECD, hereinafter the DAC). The content of China’s aid programmes, beginning in 1950, has changed and diversified over the years, and has continuously adapted to the shifting international landscape, the domestic situation, and national objectives. One estimate places China’s aid volume in 2009 at around US five billion dollars (Shimomura and Kobayashi, 2013). This affirms China’s position as one of the largest sources of foreign aid in the world today. The sheer amount involved in China’s aid programme (still growing annually) is enough to generate both apprehension and optimism within the international aid community.

Keywords

Foreign Policy Official Development Assistance Development Assistance Committee Economic Diplomacy Development Assistance Committee Donor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Dennis D. Trinidad 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dennis D. Trinidad
    • 1
  1. 1.De La Salle UniversityManilaPhilippines

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