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Martha Graham, “Picasso of American Dance,” and Katherine Dunham, “Matriarch of Black Dance”: Exoticism and Nonwhiteness in American Dance

  • Caroline Joan S. Picart

Abstract

The significance of the prior chapter lies in that it is with Balanchine that choreography first gained copyright protection; it is thus important to understand why Balanchine succeeded where Fuller failed, even if they both partook of an aesthetic of whiteness (one of whose defining traits, as earlier chapters show, is abstraction). Furthermore, as I will show in the first part of this chapter, although Graham, following Balanchine, was able to gain copyright protection of her choreographic works, her estate, unlike Balanchine’s, was not able to maintain control of her creations. The idea that ownership of choreographic works could be wrested away from the chosen heir of the choreographer was alarming to many in the dance community, and has resulted in dance circles and legal communities becoming more aware of contractual provisions and their effects.1

Keywords

Black Woman Ballet Dancer Artistic Director Italic Mine Sole Proprietorship 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© Caroline Joan S. Picart 2013

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  • Caroline Joan S. Picart

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