Do National Levels of Individualism and Internal Locus of Control Relate to Well-Being: An Ecological Level International Study

  • Paul E. Spector
  • Cary L. Cooper
  • Juan I. Sanchez
  • Michael O’Driscoll
  • Kate Sparks
  • Peggy Bernin
  • Andre Büssing
  • Phil Dewe
  • Peter Hart
  • Luo Lu
  • Karen Miller
  • Lucio Flavio Renault De Moraes
  • Gabrielle M. Ostrognay
  • Milan Pagon
  • Horea Pitariu
  • Steven Poelmans
  • Phani Radhakrishnan
  • Vesselina Russinova
  • Vladimir Salamatov
  • Jesus Salgado
  • Satoru Shima
  • Oi Ling Siu
  • Jean Benjamin Stora
  • Mare Teichmann
  • Töres Theorell
  • Peter Vlerick
  • Mina Westman
  • Maria Widerszal-Bazyl
  • Paul Wong
  • Shanfa Yu

Abstract

There has been increasing interest in cross-national research that attempts to understand differences and similarities among employees from different cultures and nations. One of the basic issues of concern to organizational researchers is the health and well-being of employees, and it has been viewed as both a response to the work environment and as an affect-related antecedent of other employee outcomes such as job performance or turnover. Employee control beliefs and perceptions have been linked to well-being and play an important role (Ganster and Fusilier, 1989; Spector, 1982). Although there is a tremendous amount of research at the individual level relating control and other variables to well-being, most has been done in the USA and a handful of western nations, and most has targeted the individual employee. Our study compared managers from 24 nations/territories at the ecological or sample mean level (Leung and Bond, 1989), as opposed to the individual participant level, in order to draw more definitive conclusions about nation differences.

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Copyright information

© Paul E. Spector, Cary L. Cooper, Juan I. Sanchez, Michael O’Driscoll, Kate Sparks, Peggy Bernin, Andre Büssing, Phil Dewe, Peter Hart, Luo Lu, Karen Miller, Lucio Flavio Renault De Moraes, Gabrielle M. Ostrognay, Milan Pagon, Horea Pitariu, Steven Poelmans, Phani Radhakrishnan, Vesselina Russinova, Vladimir Salamatov, Jesus Salgado, Satoru Shima, Oi Ling Siu, Jean Benjamin Stora, Mare Teichmann, Töres Theorell, Peter Vlerick, Mina Westman, Maria Widerszal-Bazyl, Paul Wong and Shanfa Yu 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul E. Spector
  • Cary L. Cooper
  • Juan I. Sanchez
  • Michael O’Driscoll
  • Kate Sparks
  • Peggy Bernin
  • Andre Büssing
  • Phil Dewe
  • Peter Hart
  • Luo Lu
  • Karen Miller
  • Lucio Flavio Renault De Moraes
  • Gabrielle M. Ostrognay
  • Milan Pagon
  • Horea Pitariu
  • Steven Poelmans
  • Phani Radhakrishnan
  • Vesselina Russinova
  • Vladimir Salamatov
  • Jesus Salgado
  • Satoru Shima
  • Oi Ling Siu
  • Jean Benjamin Stora
  • Mare Teichmann
  • Töres Theorell
  • Peter Vlerick
  • Mina Westman
  • Maria Widerszal-Bazyl
  • Paul Wong
  • Shanfa Yu

There are no affiliations available

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