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Territory and Health: Perspectives from Economics and Political Science

  • Joan Costa-Font
  • Scott L. Greer

Abstract

It is tempting to talk about “decentralization” as if it were simple: a technical decision to grant more authority to regional or local governments, with the objective of aligning incentives, power, and information a bit more efficiently.But decentralization is far from simple. In fact, it is not a policy, it is not just a technocratic decision, and it does not have reliable and easily predictable effects. In effect, one of the reasons why health policy specialists, economists, and political scientists have had such difficulty with the effects of decentralization on health policy and, more generally, on the welfare state is that they have paid too little attention to the specific institutional pathways in which decentralization does and does not matter.

Keywords

Gross Domestic Product Welfare State Regional Government Party System Policy Community 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Joan Costa-Font and Scott L. Greer 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joan Costa-Font
  • Scott L. Greer

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