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Strategies: The Interface of Styles, Strategies, and Motivation on Tasks

  • Andrew D. Cohen

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to consider the psychological dimensions of language learner strategies in an effort to make the construct more accessible to those working in the field of language learning. The chapter will also call attention to issues of theoretical debate and demonstrate how case-study research can contribute to understanding the process of language learning. The case is made that viewing strategies in isolation is not as beneficial to learners and instructors alike as viewing them at the intersection of learning style preferences, motivation, and specific second-language (L2) tasks.

Keywords

Language Learning Learning Style Language Acquisition Metacognitive Strategy Language Task 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Andrew D. Cohen 2012

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  • Andrew D. Cohen

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