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The Myth of the Dangerous Black Man

  • Laurie Cassidy
Part of the Content and Context in Theological Ethics book series (CCTE)

Abstract

What does it mean that “the black male” is purely a figment of white imagination? This chapter will address this question as critical to understanding hyper-incarceration in America. Interrogating the representation of black male bodies within American culture is key to understanding how we make meaning of this scandalous social reality, how it has become “common sense.”2 American culture legitimizes the prison system by imprinting, even branding, on our imagination the deep-seated myth of the “dangerous black man.”

Keywords

Cultural Production Black People White People Catholic Social Teaching White Privilege 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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    I use the term “common sense” as described by Clifford Geertz. His notion is helpful here because he defines common sense as ideas that are uncritically received and unexamined—and taken for granted as true. See Clifford Geertz, Local Knowledge: Further Essays in Interpretive Anthropology (New York: Basic Books, Third Edition, 1985).Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Alex Mikulich, Laurie Cassidy, and Margaret Pfeil 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laurie Cassidy

There are no affiliations available

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