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Mothers at the Service of the New Poverty Agenda: The PROGRESA/Oportunidades Programme in Mexico

  • Maxine Molyneux
Part of the Social Policy in a Development Context book series (SPDC)

Abstract

In Latin America as elsewhere in the world, gender bias and masculine prerogative have prevailed in social policy as in social life more broadly, with entitlements resting on culturally sanctioned and deeply rooted notions of gender difference and patriarchal authority. These have generally accorded with idealized assumptions about the asymmetric social positions occupied by the sexes with male breadwinners and female mother-dependents receiving benefits according to these normative social roles. Such assumptions have proved remarkably universal and enduring even where, as in Latin America, gender divisions have been modified by women’s mass entry into the labour force and by equal rights legislation.

Keywords

Social Policy Poverty Relief Social Sector Latin American Study Latin American Region 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© UNRISD 2006

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  • Maxine Molyneux

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