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Institutionalizing the Representation of Religious Minorities in Post-1997 Hong Kong

  • Lida V. Nedilsky

Abstract

When the British colony of Hong Kong reverted to Chinese sovereignty on July 1, 1997, a majority ethnic-Chinese city became a special administrative region of the People’s Republic of China with the promise of “Hong Kong people ruling Hong Kong.” One visible change in governance was the replacement of a British-appointed, British-born governor with a Chinese-ethnic, Hong Kong resident chief executive. In this chapter I analyze a related and overlooked aspect of the “Hong Kong people ruling Hong Kong” formula: the selection of religious representatives to fill 40 seats on an 800-person election committee (syungeui waiyuhnwui)1 that determines who will run Hong Kong as chief executive. In doing so, I focus attention on continuity rather than change: religion as a significant minority in Hong Kong.

Keywords

Chief Executive Religious Leader Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Special Administrative Region Institutional Leader 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Siu-Keung Cheung, Joseph Tse-Hei Lee, and Lida V. Nedilsky 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lida V. Nedilsky

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