Advertisement

Being There: Preparing for the Future

  • Joseph A. DiVanna
Chapter
  • 102 Downloads

Abstract

Conventional wisdom has perceived that cheap retail deposits were a structural phenomenon rather than something which had to be actively competed for on the basis of price. Structural solutions (i.e. making the branch network more efficient or improving the quality of product designs) are bound to predominate in an environment where the nature of the balance sheet is so complex, not only in the broad categories of funding and lending maturities, but also by the type of sources of funds and borrowers; and where the balance sheet structure is made more complex by processes of irrational pricing, cross-subsidization across generic product types and business sectors.1

Keywords

Business Process Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Customer Relationship Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Customer Behaviour 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

  1. 1.
    J. B. Howcroft and J. Lavis, Retail Banking: The New Revolution in Structure and Strategy, Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1986, p. 140.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    H. Engler and J. Essinger, The Future o f Banking, London: Pearson Education, 2000, p. xv.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    The Asian Banker, 27 May 2003, available at http://w■w.theasianbanker.com/.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    M. Sanchanta, ‘Japan’s first online-only bank opens’, Financial Times, 12 October 2000, p. 37.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    A. Rowley, ‘New kid on the block’, The Banker Supplement, London: Financial Times, March 200 I, p. II.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    T. Burt, ‘Carmakers eye route to twin track revenues’, Financial Times, 28 February 2001, p. 1.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    M. Dickie, ‘Sars sends stay-at-home Chinese on to the net’, Financial Times, 22 May 2003, p. 31.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    J. DiVanna, Synconomy: AddingValue in a World of Continuously ConnectedBusiness, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003, p. xi.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    G. R. Bushe and A. B. Shani, Parallel Learning Structures. Increasing Innovation in Bureaucracies, Wokingham: Addison-Wesley, I 99 I, p. 3.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    R. Brookes, ‘Ackermann set to lead Deutsche Bank’, Swisslnfo, 20 May 2002, Swiss Radio International, available at http://www.swissinfo.org/.Google Scholar
  11. I I J. Champy, X-engineering the Corporation: Reinventing your Business in the Digital Age, New York: Warner Books, 2002, p. I 60.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    A. Gunneson, Transitioning to Agility, Reading: Addison-Wesley, 1997, p. 224.Google Scholar
  13. I 3 M. L. Tushman, B. Virany and E. Romanelli, ‘Executive Succession, Strategic Reorientations, and Organization Evolution’, in M. Horwitch (ed.) Technology in the Modern Corporation: a Strategic Perspective, Oxford: Pergamon Press, 1986, p. 215.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Gunneson, Transitioning to Agility, p. 174.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    A.Toffler, The Adaptive Corporation, London: McGraw-Hill, 1985, p. 108.Google Scholar
  16. I 6 Bank of the Future Briefing Papers, Briefing Paper 3: Branches, Finsec New Zealand, available at http://www.finsec.org.nz/future_branch.htm, May 2003.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    M. Story, The Power of Happy Staff, The New Zealand Herald, 4 June 2003, available at http://www.nzherald.co.nz/employment/employmentstorydisplay.cfm?storylD=34506 I 8& thesection=employment&thesubsection=management.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    ANZ Grindlays Bank, Ahmedabad, The Branch of the Future Concept, Sudhir Gandhi Architects, available at http://www.sudhirgandhi.com/anz-ahmedabad.htm, April 2003.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    DiVanna, Synconomy, p. 176.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Bradford & Bingley, Branch of the Future, Claremont Business Designs, ClaremontEurope.com, available at http://www.claremont-europe.com/, May 2003.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Mobile Branch Facilities, MBF Industries, Inc., available at http://www.mobileatm.net/, April 2003.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Mobile Banking Courier Service, The Citizens Banking Company, available at http://www.citizensbankco.com/mobilebanking.html, April 2003.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    See DiVanna, Redefining Financial Services: The New Renaissance in Value Propositions, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2002.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    MiBanco, Banco Mercantil, Tudo I Services, Inc., available at http://www.bancomercantil. com/mercprod/site/home, May 2003.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Banco Mercantil, Venuzuela, available at http://www.bancomercantil.com/actual/informacion/ default.html?link=0–0–0.html, May 2003.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Howcroft and Lavis, Retail Banking, p. I 65.Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    BPI Direct Savings Bank, e-shopping center, available at http://www.bpidirect.com/ e-shopping/e_home.htm.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Virgin ‘The one account’, available at http://www.oneaccount.com, May 2003.Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    The Black and White Mortgage Company, available at https://www.blackwhitemortgageco. co.uk/index.htm, May 2003.Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    J. Blythe, TheEssence o f Customer Behaviour, London: Pearson Education, 1997, pp. 2–3.Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Treasures Priority Banking, DBS Bank, Singapore, available at http://www.dbs.com.sg/ treasures!, March 2003.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Joseph A. DiVanna 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph A. DiVanna

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations