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DIY Therapy: Exploring Affective Self-Representations in Trans Video Blogs on YouTube

  • Tobias Raun

Abstract

This is a statement from Simon, put forth in a video blog (vlog), recorded in his home. We can barely see Simon because of the low-level light as he speaks straight into the camera with a rather timid look on his face. In this quote Simon suggests that the camera is an integrated part of his self — documenting his thoughts and inner dialogue. But the camera also serves as an external interlocutor, a companion you can trust and tell everything. The camera becomes ‘the eye that sees and the ear that listens powerfully but without judgement and reprisal’ (Renov quoted in Matthews, 2007: 443). Here, the vlog seems to work as a therapeutic tool that enables Simon to locate and release powerful emotional energy in ways that are not possible off-screen.

Keywords

Queer Theory Trans People Ambivalent Feeling Trans Identity Trans Person 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Tobias Raun 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tobias Raun

There are no affiliations available

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