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Business Participation in Free Trade Negotiations in Chile: Impacts on Environmental and Labour Regulation

  • Benedicte Bull
Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

Business is among the main stakeholders in trade negotiations. It is therefore common practice for business associations as well as individual companies to lobby their governments to make them pursue trade agreements that suit their interests. Thus, trade negotiations have often been envisaged as a ‘two-Ievel’ game in which governments have to bargain with domestic groups and trading partners simultaneously (Putnam 1988, Intal-ITD-STA 2002). Recently many governments have involved business so closely in trade negotiations and delegated such authority to it that the sharp distinction between the two levels of the game has become blurred.

Keywords

Corporate Social Responsibility European Union Free Trade World Trade Organization Trade Agreement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • Benedicte Bull

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