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Uganda

Republic of Uganda
  • Barry Turner
Part of the The Statesman’s Yearbook book series (SYBK)

Abstract

The Luo (a Nilotic-speaking people) invaded the territory of present-day Uganda in the late 15th and 16th centuries founding several kingdoms of which the most prominent was Buganda. Uganda became a British Protectorate in 1894, the province of Buganda being recognized as a native kingdom under its Kabaka. In 1961 Uganda was granted internal self-government with federal status for Buganda. Uganda became an independent member of the Commonwealth on 9 Oct. 1962 and a republic on 8 Sept. 1967. President Milton Obote set about returning land given to the Buganda by the British in 1900 to its original Bunyoro owners. He also abolished Buganda’s federal status and autonomy in the country. A rebellion by Buganda was quelled but in 1971 Obote was overthrown by troops under Gen. Idi Amin. Amin’s rule was characterized by widespread repression and, in 1972, the expulsion of Asian residents. In April 1979 a force of the Tanzanian Army and Ugandan exiles advanced into Uganda, taking Kampala on 11 April. Amin fled into exile. In Dec. 1980, following elections, Dr Obote again became president, but on 27 July 1985 was overthrown.

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Further Reading

  1. Museveni, Y., What is Africa’s Problem? London, 1993 .—The Mustard Seed. London, 1997Google Scholar
  2. Mutibwa, P., Uganda since Independence: a Story of Unfulfilled Hopes. London, 1992Google Scholar
  3. Nyeko, B., Uganda. [Bibliography] 2nd ed. ABC-Clio, Oxford and Santa Barbara (CA), 1996Google Scholar
  4. National statistical office: Uganda Bureau of Statistics, Plo 10/11 Airport road, P. O. Box 13, Entebbe.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barry Turner

There are no affiliations available

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