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Georgia

(Sakartvelo)
  • John Scott Keltie
  • M. Epstein
Part of the The Statesman’s Yearbook book series (SYBK)

Abstract

The Georgians claim that they first appear in authentic history in the time of Alexander the Great, by whom they were conquered. But on Alexander’s death (323 b.c.), the Georgians regained their independence under Pharnavas. With Pharnavas (302–237 b.c.) began the first of four dynasties: Karthlosi (302–93 b.c.), Arsacidi (93 b.c.–267 a.d.), Khosro-Sassanidi (267–570 a.d.), and Bagratidi (570–1801). In 1801 the Russian Epnperor Alexander I. annexed the Kingdom of Georgia. When the Bolshevist regime was set up in Russia the Georgians, together with the Tartars and Armenians, formed the Transcaucasian Republic, which refused to recognise the Bolshevists. The capital of Georgia, Tiflis, became the centre of that Republic, the independence of which was formally proclaimed by the Transcaucasian Diet (Seym) on April 22, 1918. But Georgia was eventually forced to form a separate State, and on May 26, 1918, its independence was proclaimed in Tiflis by the representative organ, the National Council, elected by the National Assembly of Georgia on November 22, 1917. The Act of Independence of Georgia was approved, confirmed and ratified on March 12, 1919, by the Constituent Assembly, elected according to the electoral system of direct, equal, universal, secret and proportional voting of citizens of both sexes. The Government received de jure recognition by the Allies on January 27, 1921.

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1922

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Scott Keltie
  • M. Epstein

There are no affiliations available

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