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Natal

  • Frederick Martin
Part of the The Statesman’s Yearbook book series (SYBK)

Abstract

The colony of Natal, formerly an integral part of the Cape of Good Hope settlement, was erected into a separate government by Letters Patent issued in November 1845. A Lieutenant-Governor was appointed, as well as an Executive Council created. The Lieutenant-Governor was subordinate to the Governor of the Cape, and the Legislative Council of the latter continued to frame laws for Natal till 1848, when a separate Legislative Council was established. In 1856 Natal was erected into a distinct and separate colony, and from that time has not been under the control of the Governor of the Cape. Its affairs are administered by a Lieutenant-Governor, assisted by an Executive Council, composed of the Chief-justice, the senior officer in command of the troops, the Colonial Secretary, the Treasurer, the Attorney-General, and the Secretary for Native Affairs; and a Legislative Council, composed of four official members, namely, the Colonial Secretary, the Treasurer, the Attorney-General, and the Secretary for Native Affairs, and 12 members elected by the counties and boroughs.

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1865

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frederick Martin

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