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Abstract

  1. 1.

    Have you heard any good stories lately? What is it about stories that we find so appealing?

     
  2. 2.

    How pervasive is our use of stories or narratives? Brainstorm — with a partner or on your own — examples of narratives or stories in our daily lives (for example, news stories). What useful purposes do they serve in our daily lives?

     
  3. 3.

    How can the retelling of an event from someone’s life experience provide us with insight into the world in which we or they live?

     
  4. 4.

    What role do stories play in our understanding of who we are? In other words, how do stories help us establish our identities

     

Keywords

Qualitative Research Language Learning Sage Publication Code Word Narrative Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Garold Murray 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Garold Murray
    • 1
  1. 1.Okayama UniversityJapan

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