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Sound Machines

  • Alex Goody
Chapter
Part of the Modern and Contemporary Poetry and Poetics book series (MPCC)

Abstract

The recent upsurge of work in modernist radio studies and modernist sound studies have brought a new focus on sound technologies to bear on the literary and cultural environment of the early twentieth century. This chapter considers the technological soundscape of modernism and then, focusing on radio, examines the possibilities for communicating new visions of women’s subjectivities on the airwaves. The chapter explores how the poetry of women writers refigures the circulation of sound and silence that constitutes the medium-specific aesthetic of radio technology. Highlighting how sound technologies gave rise to technically fantasmic networks that connected disparate sites of listening and bodies of listeners, the chapter manifests the core concern of the book, arguing that intersubjectivity, the body and the politics of the human are reimagined in the encounter between modernist women’s poetry and sound technology.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alex Goody
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of English and Modern LanguagesOxford Brookes UniversityOxfordUK

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