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Buddhist Orientations to Mental Health

  • Hillary Peter Rodrigues
Chapter

Abstract

From the Buddhist perspective, ignorance about our ongoing body-mind processes contributes to erroneous views about ourselves and an unhealthy relationship to the world around us. Buddhism is a call to awaken from the sort of waking dream at the root of our psychological sorrow. Thus, in a manner accessible to non-specialists, this chapter presents some of the cardinal teachings of Buddhism, such as the Four Noble Truths, the Eightfold Path, Pratitya-samutpada, and the Anatman Doctrine. The modern Mindfulness movement illustrates how classical Buddhist meditation techniques have expanded beyond religious frameworks into secular practices with suggestive benefits for mental health and well-being. Footnote and bibliography references to both classical and contemporary academic studies are intended to provide educators and health professionals with inroads for enhanced study.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hillary Peter Rodrigues
    • 1
  1. 1.University of LethbridgeLethbridgeCanada

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