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Contexts, Epistemologies and Practices of Global South Psychologies

  • Roy Moodley
  • Jan van der Tempel
Chapter

Abstract

Historically, cultural and ethnic groups from across the globe have been engaging in complex and myriad ways to understand the human mind, body and spirit/soul through religious, sociocultural and political contexts. These engagements led to a representation of human consciousness that took into account metaphysical, psychological and physical aspects of the self and other. In the Global South, it seems that the current knowledge, ideas, and technologies of the mind, body and spirit (soul) evolved through this trans-generational quest to fathom the depths of human existence and interaction within particular contexts and communities. This chapter will explore the contexts, epistemologies and practices of Global South psychologies; exploring in depth common principles, such as holism, balance and harmony, which can be seen to underlie Ubuntu, Yin/Yang, Animism and other cultural knowledge upon which the respective systems and practices of healing and transformation have been constructed.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roy Moodley
    • 1
  • Jan van der Tempel
    • 1
  1. 1.University of TorontoTorontoCanada

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