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Indigenous Psychology in Aotearoa/New Zealand and Australia

  • Waikaremoana Waitoki
  • Pat Dudgeon
  • Linda Waimarie Nikora
Chapter

Abstract

In Aotearoa/New Zealand and Australia, the development of Indigenous psychology is a response to the resilience of a colonised people, where the gaze of Western imperialism is ever present. The use of esoteric, ceremonial, environmental, and relational knowledge is included to counter balance the individualism inherent in mainstream psychology. Across both countries, connections to ancestors, land, language, customs and relationships are important. Dudgeon’s Social and Emotional Wellbeing model offers a transformative lens for addressing the significant disparities that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ experience. While Māori wellbeing includes healthy relationships between physical, psychological, community, spirituality and environment domains. The chapter promotes a reclamation of Indigenous knowledge systems that, if not protected and promoted, could be lost from their cultural home.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Waikaremoana Waitoki
    • 1
  • Pat Dudgeon
    • 2
  • Linda Waimarie Nikora
    • 1
  1. 1.University of WaikatoHamiltonNew Zealand
  2. 2.University of Western AustraliaCrawleyAustralia

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