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Gender Inequality and Income Inequality in Iran

  • Nadereh Chamlou
Chapter

Abstract

In his monumental and seminal book Capital in the Twenty-first Century, Thomas Piketty (2014) meticulously analyzes and presents the cross-country dynamics of income inequality over the past two centuries. He offers a myriad of underlying factors and trends that have over time led to vast wealth and power accumulation of a few and limited upward mobility for the rest. His main argument is that in order to gain wealth and opportunity, birth matters more than effort or talent.

Keywords

Income Inequality Labor Force Participation Gender Inequality Unite Nations Development Programme Income Share 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nadereh Chamlou
    • 1
  1. 1.International Development AdvisorWasington, DCUSA

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