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Introduction: Conjectures on Undisciplined Research

  • Debra A. Castillo
  • Shalini Puri
Chapter

Abstract

This introduction explores what happens to fieldwork when it shifts discipline, shifts form, shifts audience, shifts medium, shifts end point, and shifts traditions of interaction: in short, when information gleaned from the field is routed back into an undisciplining form of inquiry. It situates the project of fieldwork in the humanities in relation to the histories of cultural studies, anthropology, area studies, and postcolonial studies. In contrast with these areas of study, fieldwork in the humanities often involves disciplinary isolation and professional incomprehension. We argue for the value of combining textual study with lived experience in transforming our scholarly practices, opening the conversation without asking that these fieldwork-inspired practices become standardized, prescriptive, or paradigmatic.

Keywords

Cultural Study Tour Guide Literary Text Latin American Study Global South 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Debra A. Castillo
    • 1
  • Shalini Puri
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Comparative LiteratureCornell UniversityIthacaUSA
  2. 2.English DepartmentUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA

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