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Manufacturing

  • Mozammel Huq
  • Michael Tribe
Chapter

Abstract

The Ghanaian manufacturing has been the subject of a significant number of research-based publications using a limited dataset. In referring to a ‘limited’ dataset the meaning is paucity of data. The most recent consistent series of value-added data, published regularly in the GSS Quarterly Digest of Statistics until the demise of that publication in 2000, ends in 2003 (GSS, n.d.-a; UNIDO, 2017). Data from the World Bank’s ‘Regional Project on Enterprise Development’ (CSAE, 2017), which have been used in detailed economic analysis, are also available for a period ending in 2003.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mozammel Huq
    • 1
  • Michael Tribe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsUniversity of StrathclydeGlasgowUK

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