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The Little and the Large: A Little Book and Connected History Between Asia and Africa

  • Shamil Jeppie
Chapter
Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

This chapter explores how a little prayer book with origins in the southern Arabian Peninsula circulated on the southern tip of the African continent. The prayer was the Rātib al-Haddād, and it was arranged by a Sufi luminary in Yemen sometime in the late seventeenth or early eighteenth century. It probably circulated orally at first, but its transformation into manuscript and then printed book form is what animates this chapter. Through it we trace the movements of ideas and people between Southeast Asia, Arabia, East Africa, and the Cape. This chapter is an exercise that combines book history with microhistory at a transcontinental level.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shamil Jeppie
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Historical StudiesUniversity of Cape TownRondeboschSouth Africa

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