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“Moral Power” of the EU through its Conflict Resolution Policy in the South Caucasus

  • Syuzanna Vasilyan
Chapter

Abstract

With conflicts eroding the social, economic and political transformation of Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia, this chapter focuses on the EU’s policy of resolving the conflicts of Abkhazia, South Ossetia and Nagorno-Karabakh. Offering a genesis into the literature revealing the causes of eruption of conflicts, as well as the stages of conflict resolution, the research presents a nuanced analysis of the existing schemes of mediation per conflict and the role of the relevant EU and other foreign actors all of whom have largely “dealt with” the conflicts rather than “managed” to facilitate settlement. EU’s “power” is deemed “partly actual” on inclusiveness, “largely potential” in terms of coherence and “potential” on five moral parameters of consequentialism, consistency, normative steadiness, balance between values and interests, and external legitimacy.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Syuzanna Vasilyan
    • 1
  1. 1.Université Libre de BruxellesBrusselsBelgium

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