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Using Corpora to Investigate Chinese University EFL Learners

  • Bin Zou
  • Hayo Reinders
Chapter
Part of the New Language Learning and Teaching Environments book series (NLLTE)

Abstract

The language teaching profession in China faces a number of significant challenges in providing university students with high-quality instruction, as many studies have shown there is considerable room for improvement. A recent move towards EAP teaching appears to have a number of benefits for learners, but significantly more research is needed to make definitive claims about its impact. A gap in the research derives from the fact that relatively little is known about Chinese learners’ inter-language development, especially at more advanced levels. In this article we describe how learner corpora can be used to find out more about the needs of Chinese learners of English. We argue for the development of an EAP corpus specific to advanced level learners.

Keywords

EAP Corpus College English 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bin Zou
    • 1
  • Hayo Reinders
    • 2
  1. 1.Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool UniversitySuzhou ShiChina
  2. 2.Unitec, Auckland New Zealand and Anaheim UniversityAnaheimUSA

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