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Heritage, Community, and Indigenous Languages

  • Shereen Bhalla
  • Terrence G. Wiley

Abstract

This chapter addresses the current and historical aspects of data related to the population and perspective of heritage, community, and indigenous language populations in the United States. Through the use of census data, it is the goal of this chapter to increase knowledge about speakers and users of these languages as well as the policies and practices which promote or dissuade language development. In addition, the chapter focuses on the historical patterns of immigration, the role of language, and the subsequent impact on heritage, community, and indigenous language programs. Additional areas of investigation include the impetus of language policy on language programs and advancement within the United States.

Keywords

Heritage languages Community languages Methodologies Critical languages 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Applied LinguisticsWashington, DCUSA

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