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Applied Linguistics Research: Current Issues, Methods, and Trends

  • Aek Phakiti
  • Peter De Costa
  • Luke Plonsky
  • Sue Starfield

Abstract

This chapter provides a broad contextualisation of the Handbook, locating its focus within current debates and concerns of relevance to the field of applied linguistics. The editors highlight the field’s growing interest in research methodology and offer a rationale for the selection of topics and issues in the Handbook, such as methodological reform, transparency, transdisciplinarity, and the impact of technology.

Keywords

Applied linguistics Methodology Data analysis Research instruments Ethics 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aek Phakiti
    • 1
  • Peter De Costa
    • 2
  • Luke Plonsky
    • 3
  • Sue Starfield
    • 4
  1. 1.Sydney School of Education and Social WorkThe University of SydneySydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Linguistics and LanguagesMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA
  3. 3.Northern Arizona UniversityFlagstaffUSA
  4. 4.School of EducationUNSW SydneySydneyAustralia

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