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Policing the Criminal Record

  • Margaret Fitzgerald O’Reilly
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter documents the role past criminal records play in the investigation of crimes. The lack of empirical data in Ireland makes it difficult to assess the true impact of past record upon police work, thus the chapter comprises a number of elements in order to evaluate the significance of a past conviction in this area. This includes a look at the nature and extent of police powers and targeting practices towards particular groups of offenders. The chapter assesses the potential effect of targeting practices upon ex-offenders in Ireland and elsewhere. It also examines the criminal record databases that exist both in Ireland and internationally including Interpol, Europol, the Schengen Information System (SIS), and the European criminal records information system (ECRIS).

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margaret Fitzgerald O’Reilly
    • 1
  1. 1.University of LimerickLimerickIreland

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