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Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Introduction

  • Khalid Karim
Chapter
Part of the The Language of Mental Health book series (TLMH)

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of neurodevelopmental conditions which can present very differently in each person, and are likely to have other problems/disorders which can affect matters further. In addition the classification is constantly evolving, with changes in the terminology and diagnostic criteria. This chapter provides an overview of ASD and explores some of the issues surrounding this condition. Individuals with ASD experience multiple intrinsically linked challenges in their social interactions due to problems with expressive, receptive, and paralinguistic communication. In the chapter, we explore the role of research around communication in individuals with ASD, particularly on conversation analysis and discourse analysis approaches, and the benefits that these approaches may have.

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Recommended Reading

  1. Karim, K., Ali, A., & O’Reilly, M. (2014). A practical guide to mental health problems in children with autistic spectrum disorder: “It’s not just their ASD”! London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.Google Scholar
  2. Lester, J., Karim, K., & O’Reilly, M. (2015). “ASD itself actually isn’t a disability”: The ideological dilemmas of negotiating a ‘normal’ versus ‘abnormal’ autistic identity. Communication & Medicine, 11(2), 139–152.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Nichols, S. (2008). Girls growing up on the Autistic Spectrum. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.Google Scholar
  4. Wing, L., & Gould, J. (1979). Severe impairments of social interaction and associated abnormalities in children: Epidemiology and classification. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 9(1), 11–29.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Khalid Karim
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Leicester and Leicestershire Partnership TrustLeicesterUK

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