Alternative UK Trade Relationships Post-Brexit

  • Mark Baimbridge
  • Ioannis Litsios
  • Karen Jackson
  • Uih Ran Lee
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter discusses several key issues for the United Kingdom (UK) in relation to Brexit. Firstly, it looks at how new directions could be initiated to fund infrastructure aimed at boosting the UK’s future growth potential and/or promote reindustrialisation by nurturing strategic industries through the early and unknowable stages of their development until they achieve their own international competitive advantage. Secondly, we contest the belief that globalisation has created a new environment that erodes the efficiency of traditional policy instruments and with it the relevance of individual nation states. Finally, in this context we conclude by arguing that Brexit offers a unique opportunity to negotiate a new trade relationship with the European Union (EU), together with the rest of the world, to both replace previous trade deals concluded by the EU and establish a new set of relationships with a wider set of potential trade partners.

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Copyright information

© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2017, corrected publication March 2018. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark Baimbridge
    • 1
  • Ioannis Litsios
    • 2
  • Karen Jackson
    • 3
  • Uih Ran Lee
    • 4
  1. 1.School of Management University of BradfordBradfordUK
  2. 2.Plymouth Business School University of PlymouthPlymouthUK
  3. 3.Westminster Business School University of WestminsterLondonUK
  4. 4.Department of Economics and Related StudiesUniversity of YorkYorkUK

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