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Edwin Cannan (1861–1935)

  • Keith TribeEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Edwin Cannan was appointed founding Professor of Political Economy at London School of Economics (LSE) in 1907, having taught at the School from 1895. He had earlier made his mark as a historical scholar of economics, most notably in editing an edition of Adam Smith’s Lectures in 1896 and then in 1904 editing a new edition of Smith’s Wealth of Nations that remained the standard work of reference until 1976. His sceptical, not to say combatively liberal, approach to economic analysis was a major factor in the creation of a distinct LSE style during the interwar years, conveyed to generations of students in his lectures on the principles of economics.

Keywords

Adam Smith Oxford economics Local taxation Alfred Marshall Distribution Production Economic policy 

References

Main Works by Edwin Cannan

  1. Cannan, E. (1885). The Duke of Saint Simon. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  2. Cannan, E. (1888). Elementary Political Economy. London: Henry Frowde.Google Scholar
  3. Cannan, E. (1893). A History of the Theories of Production and Distribution in English Political Economy from 1776 to 1848. First edition. London: P.S. King & Son.Google Scholar
  4. Cannan, E. (1896). The History of Local Rates in England: Five Lectures. London: Longmans, Green & Co.Google Scholar
  5. Cannan, E. (1902). ‘The Practical Utility of Economic Science’. Economic Journal, 12(48): 459–471.Google Scholar
  6. Cannan, E. (1912). The Economic Outlook. London: T. Fisher Unwin.Google Scholar
  7. Cannan, E. (1914). Wealth: A Brief Explanation of the Causes of Economic Welfare. London: P.S. King & Son.Google Scholar
  8. Cannan, E. (1924). A History of the Theories of Production and Distribution in English Political Economy from 1776 to 1848. Third edition. London: P.S. King & Son.Google Scholar
  9. Cannan, E. (1927). An Economist’s Protest. London: P.S. King & Son.Google Scholar
  10. Cannan, E. (1929). A Review of Economic Theory. London: P.S. King & Son.Google Scholar

Other Works Referred To

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  22. Smith, A. (1904). An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations. Edited by E. Cannan. London: Methuen & Co.Google Scholar
  23. Smith, A. (1976). An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations. Edited by R.H. Campbell, A.S. Skinner and W.B. Todd. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Independent ScholarMalvernUK

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